Using digital pins as Power Ground?

I have an arduino Elegoo Uno R3 and I want to hook up several magnetic locks to the digital pins via ground wires and then program it to when it receives a certain code, to disable that connection so the lock loses power.

I recently learned that power ground isn't something they can normally do. Is there a way I can rig it up with a breadboard and various accessories in order to pull off something like I described?

Thanks.

Is there a way I can rig it up with a breadboard and various accessories in order to pull off something like I described?

Possibly if you explain what to do in a bit more detail. You can do this with a simple transistor, but how much current does your lock take? These tend to be high current things. You can treat your lock just like a motor, so subistute your lock for the motors in this link:- http://www.thebox.myzen.co.uk/Workshop/Motors_1.html However if you plan on using anything over 1 amp in total you better wire it up properly, bread boards will not like that sort of current.

Grumpy_Mike: Possibly if you explain what to do in a bit more detail. You can do this with a simple transistor, but how much current does your lock take? These tend to be high current things. You can treat your lock just like a motor, so subistute your lock for the motors in this link:- http://www.thebox.myzen.co.uk/Workshop/Motors_1.html However if you plan on using anything over 1 amp in total you better wire it up properly, bread boards will not like that sort of current.

The entire scope of the project is 8 small magnetic locks being controlled by one keypad. Each unique code will open a unique cabinet. We're using smaller magnetic locks that only take 12v.

I'll take a look at your link and try it out. Thanks!

This is from my business partner:

"So each maglock (12v) needs to be grounded to a NO/NC switch that kills ground from arduino allowing the lock to open. This is done easily through a single 4x4 keypad but we are wanting to use arduino to power 8 locks."

We're using smaller magnetic locks that only take 12v.

The voltage is the least of it, you need to know the current.

Grumpy_Mike: The voltage is the least of it, you need to know the current.

Whoops. 110mA.

OK that is fine, you should be able to use this:-

A TPIC6B595 can drive eight <=150mA solenoids.
And only needs three control wires.
Needs only a 100n bypass cap on the supply.
More chips can be added, using the same three control wires.
Leo…