Using multiple MOSFET as swicthes controlled by Arduino

I have 2 circuits im trying to build. But i cant figure out how i would replace the switches with MOSFETS so that i can controll them with my arduino uno.

I have some N-channel MOSFETS (IRF7010PbF) laying around which is hope to use. But maybe i need some other components to make this work.

ive been thinking about using opto-couplers to isolate the arduino. But still i cant figure out how to connect everything to the arduino.

Below is a description of the system and 2 images.
Im thankful for any kind of help with this.

Circuit 1:

1: S1 turns on to charge the capacitor.
2: S1 turns off.
3: S2 and S3 turns on at the same time. Current goes through the inductor.
4: S2 and S3 turns off. The back EMF from the inductor is collected in the capacitor.

Circuit 2:

1: S1 turns on to charge the first capacitor.
2: S1 turns off.
3: S2 turns on. current goes though the inductor.
4: S2 turns off. Back EMF is collected in the second capacitor.
5: S3 turns on. current goes though the inductor in the opposite direction.
6: S3 turns off. Back EMF is collected in the first capacitor.

So a total of 6 MOSFETS.

No too hard Simply google "arduino mosfet"

Take an example project from there and get that working as a single switch them just add extra mosfets in the order you want them with suitable delay times between them one more at a time.

I would not try to do them all at once in case it confuses things trying to remember which is which.

Don't forget that logic level MOSFETS are preferable.

Thanks for the answer. But it seams to be more complicated then just a regular MOSFET as a switch setup.

It seams like the inductor interfere with the mosfet. i read somewhere that if the drain has lower potential then the source the mosfet behaves like a forward-biasd diod.

BUT, maybe this is caused by limitations in the circuit simulator im using?. you can try it out here:

http://tinyurl.com/y35yp7r4

Mosfets are what I said.

Circuit sims often have some limitations over the practicality unless they allow a logic ladder to be involved so you can set conditions as your initial post suggests.

Eg.

IF A=state,
wait x
B=state,
wait x
C=state
wait x
else do restart
etc. etc.

Ok. Im not sure i understand exactly about the logic ladder. But are you saing that i could set states in the simulator to simulate the diffirent switch combination with a time delay?
In that case i did that manually by clicking the switches connected to the mosfet in the simulator to test the diffirent states. The first mosfet works fine. But when i turn on the second switch (step 3) the circuit goes haywire.

Firstly MOSFETs are not general switches, they only control current in one direction, and conduct
unconditionally in the other, so you have to make sure they are the right way round and that the
circuit never reverses the current (or you'll need a series diode).

Secondly the control electrode has to be driven relative to the source terminal, and that
can be inconvenient to do in circuits with floating switches (not switched directly to ground
or the supply).

Optoisolated FETs are probably whats needed here to solve the driving issues. Such devices are
the building blocks of solid state relays, with an array of photodiodes to drive the gate optically.

An ordinary optoisolator wont do.

Thanks Mark. I agree with you about using opto-couplers to isolate the controller. I have been looking at various solid state relays. but most of them are zero-crossing "turn off", even tho they are random "turn on".

The solution im prusuing now is to use a voltalic opto-coupler that can accually drive the mosfet directly.
The VOM1271 seams to be a candidate: https://www.vishay.com/docs/83469/vom1271.pdf

im trying now to figure out if that opto could drive the IRF7010PbF mosfets that i have laying around:

But that might be the subject for an another forum thread i guess.

In the VOM1271 datasheet there is also an example curcuit of a bidirectional MOSFET driver setup. (attached image). This would require two mosfets for each "switch" im not sure if the specified opto-coupler can handle two of the IRF7010 at the same time. Maybe i could use the Single MOSFET driver circuit if i add a diod.

"Secondly the control electrode has to be driven relative to the source terminal, and that
can be inconvenient to do in circuits with floating switches (not switched directly to ground
or the supply)."

I dont completely understand the implications of the statement above. Would this affect the opto-coupler solution, maybe you could elaborate a bit?