Using sensors go drive relays.

So, I am supposed to come up with a hybrid AC/DC microgrid whereby acs712 sensors are used to detect the operating system current and then trigger the relays in the event of a fault. The protections system should be based on IoT.
I have been told the project is pretty easy but I don't know where to start in terms of implementation of the project after buying the needed stuff.
Any guidance on this will be appreciated.

but I don't know where to start in terms of implementation of the project

You'd start with a far better description of what the Arduino is supposed to do.

If I were you I'd start by asking for guidance from those who dumped this on you and said it was easy....

(Unless of course it's work, and your supervisor has a reasonable assumption that it should be easy for you?)

PaulS:
You'd start with a far better description of what the Arduino is supposed to do.

  1. use ACS712 hall effect sensors to get current values from the system.
  2. the values are then acquired by Arduino uno R3 microcontroller and uploaded to an IoT platform.
    3.The data is processed by the IoT platform and is supposed to issue trigger signals if the current values are greater than the preset threshold values.
  3. if trigger signals are issued, the relays should open thus stopping current flow.

Can't you just compare the current to the threshold in the Arduino and shut things down there and then?

What value does the IoT add to this whole process?

arduin_ologist:
What value does the IoT add to this whole process?

It allows time for a fire to get under way.

...R

arduin_ologist:
Can't you just compare the current to the threshold in the Arduino and shut things down there and then?

What value does the IoT add to this whole process?

1.IoT brings in remote operability of the system.
2.I need a code to be able to do that. I am new to all these and this project was dumped on me at the last minute.

maseki:
1.IoT brings in remote operability of the system.

Remote monitoring is fine.

Anything that introduces a delay in a critical action (or, potentially a complete failure to act) is not.

...R

maseki:
4. if trigger signals are issued, the relays should open thus stopping current flow.

Who's responsible for this part?