UV ROBOT

Hi All

Hope you all safe and healthy :wink:

I am from London and I need your all to help on design UV robot. My task is to build robot which disinfects the supermarket shelves. The idea is to build robot which drives around the store at night while shop is closed and sterilize all the shells using UV-C light lamps. The same like in hospitals but simple and cheap :slight_smile:

Something like that :
http://www.uvd-robots.com/#uvdr-bullets

. While I need to get it done very quickly I have no time to research what is best and easiest to use and guys any suggestion for me is life saving :slight_smile:

So tasks is to what I can see, it just first ideas but I need your opinion in any single of them.:

  1. Robot needs to drive itself by coordinates (GPS mostly bad inside the supermarkets) .Needs to move from point A-B-C-D..... etc.
  2. IR sensors to avoid unexpected objects probably is important but maybe is it not necessary as the shop before closing at night could make sure that there is no obstacles. (because time ands cost are mandatory in this project)
  3. Robot will drive in easy ands flat shop surface but need to care 6 UV lights, which are light in weight but are long in height (about 1.5-1.8m) so I am thinking the rides should be wider as usual adruino robot to prevent falling on corners.
  4. Robot needs to drive it self for a ~2 hours and support 6x8w lamps

Any idea will be helpfully for me

Thank You so much

It'd be quicker and easier to dress operators in suits and masks to sweep with wands kept close to surfaces.

I was just surfing the subject, last page was

And I'm seeing that UVC led is super-effective I can't help but wonder what PWM duty cycle would be best as opposed to the 100% I keep seeing? 50% would double the life of the short-life UVC leds and might still be overkill if moved at moderate speeds close to the target surfaces. Like that, 5% might be enough, the surface gets a 100us UVC flash every 2ms, leds live 20x as long.

Intensity of the light is by inverse square. At 1/4 the distance the same bulb delivers 16x the intensity.

In the supermarket, UVC light will reduce the shelf life of all foods that are not protected, which are the majority of foods, only canned foods will escape.
To kill bacteria and viruses depends on the power of the lamp and the exposure time, which can be up to 30 minutes at the same point.
Plants and animals must be out of reach and the supermarket must not have translucent windows to the street.

As for the robot, the simplest is to make a line follower with low speed.

It won't be that difficult to design such a robot but it will need extra effort of course as you look beginner in Arduino.

Anyways, first you need to buy all the modules and sensors i.e. you can buy a simple robot from adafruit or aparkfun and then you will need Arduino Mega ( UNO will work as well, I think ) and GPS Module ( skm53 is a good option ).

NExt you need to design the code i.e. controlling motors of your robot and getting coordinates from GPS etc.

For hurdle avoidance you can use Ultrasonic sensor HC-SR04.

Yeah right, buy all the hardware and THEN find out what you really need.

No, DON'T buy all the hardware unless you have a working design as good as you could want.

Buying is the easy part. Looking at money sunk into a box of "stuck with" is a bit harder.

I think it would be better to just do what the hospitals do... go to page 13 " The U.S. Center for Disease Control and
Prevention (CDC) recommends that hospital isolation rooms be ventilated with at least 12 clean, outside air changes each hour (Siegel et al., 2007). In addition, the general rule for the number of UV lightbulbs in a room is that one 30 W fixture should be used for every 18 m^2 of floor area or for every seven people in the room. In a study by Xu et al. (2005) that included fourfold higher UV wattage than is recommended by CDC guidelines, it was shown that UV irradiation that is uniformly distributed throughout a room is more effective than UV radiation of nonuniform distribution."

No?

FirstRodeo:
I think it would be better to just do what the hospitals do... go to page 13 " The U.S. Center for Disease Control and
Prevention (CDC) recommends that hospital isolation rooms be ventilated with at least 12 clean, outside air changes each hour (Siegel et al., 2007). In addition, the general rule for the number of UV lightbulbs in a room is that one 30 W fixture should be used for every 18 m^2 of floor area or for every seven people in the room. In a study by Xu et al. (2005) that included fourfold higher UV wattage than is recommended by CDC guidelines, it was shown that UV irradiation that is uniformly distributed throughout a room is more effective than UV radiation of nonuniform distribution."

No?

UV does kill a lot of pathogens and if you look deeper, UVA is good for some, UVB gets more and UVC gets the resistant ones like the new virus that takes stronger UVC than sunlight at Earth surface to destroy. UVC leds crank out enough to destroy the virus quickly and also degrade plastics, burn skin and blind eyes with the same ease.

Next after UVC is X-rays.

I suggest you to have a look at the hackerfarm's blog, there are some usefull informations about UV-C for disinfection: Introducing Project Potatohead – A Farm-To-Foodbank Initiative
See also: check this: Full Page Reload

It seems that the web is indeed a vast knee-deep sea of facts.