VGA's death in 5 years will effect microcontroller

This news will have an effect on microcontrollers as VGA will be less popular and current microcontrollers may not be fast enough to drive HDMI video.

Say Goodbye to VGA Graphics as Intel and AMD Partner for the Execution

http://it.tmcnet.com/topics/it/articles/125118-say-goodbye-vga-graphics-as-intel-amd-partner.htm

VGA Given 5 Years to Live

http://www.technewsworld.com/story/VGA-Given-5-Years-to-Live-71420.html

Sounds like a business opportunity for someone to create a VGA-to-HDMI (or VGA-to-whatever) converter to allow microcontroller-based products to generate simple VGA video. Just like the FT232 allows microcontrollers to still assume PC's have serial ports!

-- The Rugged Motor Driver: two H-bridges, more power than an L298, fully protected

Maybe something ike this could be used: http://vgatohdmi.com/

Yup, something exactly like that except a lot smaller (like a single chip!) and a lot less than $79.95 :)

-- The Quick Shield: breakout all 28 pins to quick-connect terminals

1) Monitors are likely to continue to support VGA for a long time after it disappears from video cards. (take a look at how many different inputs are supported on the back of a typical TV now.)

2) HDMI theoretically supports resolutions down the the bottom of VGA (640x480), so I'm not so sure it's impossible to drive it from SW.

3) Current microcontrollers aren't really "fast enough to drive VGA" anyway; projects that do so are mostly curiosities rather than really useful devices.

4) There isn't really much point having a microcontroller use VGA to drive the now-common LCD displays. The CPU/etc inside an LCD monitor is more powerful than most microcontrollers anyway; there's even already a text generator inside most of them. Too bad the standard interfaces don't include a "data" interface in addition to the display interface...

I have to agree with westfw. It's not going to make any difference.

The only thing it might do is drive the price of VGA monitors down more which can only be a good thing.

Mowcius

Personally (and I left a similar comment on the first linked article), I think this has less to do with the stated reasons (read: smokescreen), when the real reason is likely to be end-to-end video encryption ala CSS as found on DVDs.

The arguments about PCB space are absurd, especially given the number of premium video cards I have seen taking up multiple slots (when will they bring back the full-length card?). Maybe on motherboards, but why not just increase the size of the motherboard instead of making it smaller? These arguments all seem like a hand-waving distraction from their true aims, which are likely largely influenced by entertainment IP lobbyists and other players in that arena (who all hold stake in the gaming market, and thus help drive developments in video card technologies).

I expect to someday see the complete end of devices like DVRs, replaced with "video-on-demand-on-cloud" or some such marketing buzz. Why keep a system in-house to store your videos, when instead they are safe on the fuzzy, soft "cloud"...

...where they can lease it back to you over and over again (watch your movie again, only for a $1.00!) and cha-ching! Of course, this storage will be opened up to allow you to store other stuff (like your e-books, and your games, and your data, and your resume, and etc) - for $29.99/month, $1.00 extra-per-gig over 100 gig (or some such similar scheme); all to make you pay, and pay, and pay.

And if you don't pay (or can't pay?) - say goodbye to your memories of your wedding. Say goodbye to your dissertation from college. Say goodbye to that business plan you've been working on for a couple of years (they'll probably harvest it and sell it to someone else, though). Then there are the "targetted" adverts done via mining all that data about yourself.

They'll probably claim it is all encrypted, but how will you really know? I see a lot of this stuff all as a ploy to remove the personal computer from the control of people (and ultimately even small businesses!); do we really want to go back to the concept of "centralized data processing"? Many have seem to have forgotten why the personal computer was such a boon to businesses (and individuals in general)! They tried once before to market such a concept to us (in the form of "network PCs" and such), that was ultimately rejected because the power of such machines couldn't compete with standalone boxes.

I guess we'll just see where the market will take us, unfortunately.

:-/

I expect to someday see the complete end of devices like DVRs, replaced with "video-on-demand-on-cloud" or some such marketing buzz. Why keep a system in-house to store your videos, when instead they are safe on the fuzzy, soft "cloud"...

The people who promote this technique had better first figure out how to get any broadband service at any speed to rural residents.

Don

Quote:
I expect to someday see the complete end of devices like DVRs, replaced with "video-on-demand-on-cloud" or some such marketing buzz. Why keep a system in-house to store your videos, when instead they are safe on the fuzzy, soft "cloud"...
The people who promote this technique had better first figure out how to get any broadband service at any speed to rural residents.  

Don

They don't care about those people.

No need to worry - people will build what they want to build. There will always be a personal computer with storage if you want it, and there will always be people decrypting media - if it goes into a screen and you watch it with your eyes, the data is there.

The cloud might be useful for some things, but it wont take over while there are people who want home based storage.

They don't care about those people. Tell me about it.... The dial-up peaks out at about 18.6 since the wires are merely buried in the (gravel) road.

Don