Vibration sensor project

First let me just say that, although I’m very interested in learning, much of the conversation in this forum is above my head at the moment. The purpose of this post is to describe a project I need completed and I’m willing to hire someone to do it. A bonus would be if that person were amenable to ‘teaching me the ropes’ just a bit.

What I need is an Arduino-based board with a vibration sensor that is capable of measuring very short periods of time. The vibration that it will be measuring may only last for a few microseconds. Then I just need that data outputted to my computer. I think this might be a pretty simple project for someone who knows what they’re doing. ;-)

Please PM me if interested, or email me at chris.stubbs1425@gmail.com.

Sylvester_McBean: What I need is an Arduino-based board with a vibration sensor that is capable of measuring very short periods of time. The vibration that it will be measuring may only last for a few microseconds.

So start describing.

I don't know whether anyone is yet interested in working on your secret project, but I put it to you that they are a whole lot more likely to become interested if you can actually explain what it is! :astonished:

if what you say is all you need, then you should be able to do it.

get an Arduino and get every type of vibration sensors there are. we can help with that list.

vibration is a harmonic so will probably have multiple vibrations that are at different frequencies, but at some point, they align and the vibration then is much more noticeable/powerful, then fades as each frequency separates from the others.

you say microseconds. what you see as microseconds might actually be just that, or it might build over some longer period of time… nano-seconds or some such.

also, vibration is often from a point. for a human an up and down of an earthquake is not the same as the side to side or front to back. so, you might need a sensor on each plane.

also, if you know the frequency you want, you might need to tune your sensor(s)

give us more details of what is shaking.

Vibration lasting a few microseconds.
That’s got to be a VERY high frequency. Even if only a single wave in that few microseconds, and that “few” being a generous 10 (you see: we need numbers), that’s translating to a 100 kHz frequency.
However as it’s vibration, that implies multiple waves, so then you’re getting into the MHz range.

Next: amplitude. You didn’t mention anything about that. What’s the amplitude of the vibration you try to measure?

What material is it that actually vibrates?

Thank you everyone for the replies. What I'm looking for has changed a bit... Originally I just wanted a binary, on/off output with the duration the vibration was detected. Now I'm thinking I would like a magnitude/amplitude component as well. I have no preference on Arduino board or any other hardware components, only that they be as cheap as reasonably possible.

Another question... I understand that fundamentally a microphone isn't very different than a vibration sensor, and I also understand that an oscilloscope can detect things like sine waves from the varying voltage coming from a microphone. Would this work with a vibration sensor too? For example, could an oscilloscope paired to a vibration sensor attached to a thin piece of metal detect sine waves in the form of sound waves hitting the other side of the metal?

This is an idea I have that may turn into a commercial product, so you can understand why I'm being vague with the details. If you are someone with experience in electrical engineering/writing code/physics and you think you might have interest in the project, PM me.

Again, thank you very much for the replies. I really appreciate it!

Sylvester_McBean: Thank you everyone for the replies. What I'm looking for has changed a bit... Originally I just wanted a binary, on/off output with the duration the vibration was detected. Now I'm thinking I would like a magnitude/amplitude component as well. I have no preference on Arduino board or any other hardware components, only that they be as cheap as reasonably possible.

Another question... I understand that fundamentally a microphone isn't very different than a vibration sensor, and I also understand that an oscilloscope can detect things like sine waves from the varying voltage coming from a microphone. Would this work with a vibration sensor too? For example, could an oscilloscope paired to a vibration sensor attached to a thin piece of metal detect sine waves in the form of sound waves hitting the other side of the metal?

This is an idea I have that may turn into a commercial product, so you can understand why I'm being vague with the details. If you are someone with experience in electrical engineering/writing code/physics and you think you might have interest in the project, PM me.

Again, thank you very much for the replies. I really appreciate it!

That would be at least $100 per hour plus expenses. Perhaps more. Is that in your budget?

Paul

Based on the awfully limited information there's no way to tell if your project is even technically/physically possible in the first place.

wvmarle: Based on the awfully limited information there's no way to tell if your project is even technically/physically possible in the first place.

Or to put it another way,

Sylvester_McBean: This is an idea I have that may turn into a commercial product, so you can understand why I'm being vague with the details.

OK, that means you will only ever get even more vague answers. See ya!


The previous poster's tagline says it all!