Vibrator (mechanical oscillator) power considerations

I want to build a mechanical vibrator that can be used to vibrate surfaces at which the vibrator touches - the idea is to feed some waveform and touch a surface used as a resonance cavity. I thought of using a simple and small loudspeaker, to remove the soft membrane, and to attach some hard surface instead. My question is concerned with the power consumption of such a device - how can I estimate what voltage and current I would need? I want the amplitude to be about 1 to 2 mm, and the power to be (just a guess) 1 to few Watts. Given a specific loudspeaker, is there a way to estimate what the amplitude (I mean the mechanical one) would be for a given input voltage?

You can test the displacement of a speaker using different DC voltages. That will give you your total amplitude needed.

There are devices known as vibrators ( no , don't laugh) made by specialist companies for testing the toughness of electronics devices - much used in the aerospace industry.

They're basically a loudspeaker-like magnet/ coil assembly , but instead of the cone they have a nut and bolt to which you attach the victim.

They come in various sizes - from a few watts to 10's of kW, driven by huge amplifiers.

Ling Dynamic in Royston , England used to make them , but I bet there are plenty of other suppliers

Allan

You can test the displacement of a speaker using different DC voltages

Of course, but I also need to estimate the power needed, how much mechanical power can be transmitted - after all, moving air (which is what a speaker do) is easier then moving a hard surface.

There are devices known as vibrators

Do you have a suggestion for a keyword I can search? because ‘vibrator’ gives many (unrelated…) results. I also tried ‘mechanical shaker’, and ‘vibration motor’ which mostly results in these tiny motors used to create a vibration in cell phones.

Try Ling Dynamics - gives you lots of useful links.

Allan.