Voltage regulator

Dear all,

I’ve got a (hopefully) quick question.
For my project I want to add a voltage regulator, I’ve bought the step-up/step-down voltage regulator from pololu Pololu 6V Step-Up/Step-Down Voltage Regulator S18V20F6. I want to add it in an already soldered circuit (PCB so can’t make too many changes). I’f I let’s say put in between my batteries and the off/on switch, will it draw any energy from my batteries if the switch is off?

So what I’m actually asking is if someone knows the circuit is closed if I attach the voltage regulator to my batteries (plus and minus) and not attach any output from the voltage regulator?

Look in the link that you posted for quescient current. That is how much current the regulator uses when the output is open (not supplying current). Why not put the switch between the battery and regulator?

If your Power Supply is connected to the battery at all it will draw a small amount of current even with the switch to your whatever it is is off - for no current draw you need to remove power completely from the new Power Supply, there are a few components on the PS that will draw a small amount of current if powered up even if you are not drawing anything from the PS

Looks like someone got ahead of me here - but I will stand with what I hope is an accurate answer

Quiescent current is the correct answer.

groundFungus:
Why not put the switch between the battery and regulator?

The switch is soldered on a custom made PCB board so therefore it's not that easy to put in between the battery and regulator...

Though the answers are clear, thank you all!
My best guess is that I will just take one of the batteries out when I'm not using the device for a longer period of time.

Cornedej:
Dear all,

I've got a (hopefully) quick question.
For my project I want to add a voltage regulator, I've bought the step-up/step-down voltage regulator from pololu Pololu 6V Step-Up/Step-Down Voltage Regulator S18V20F6. I want to add it in an already soldered circuit (PCB so can't make too many changes). I'f I let's say put in between my batteries and the off/on switch, will it draw any energy from my batteries if the switch is off?

So what I'm actually asking is if someone knows the circuit is closed if I attach the voltage regulator to my batteries (plus and minus) and not attach any output from the voltage regulator?

To avoid any "regulator quiescent current" worries, simply leave the regulator attached and switch the unregulated input power.

Note it's probably unlikely, but it's POSSIBLE that the regulator puts out more voltage than spec in the milliseconds it takes to power up.

Therefore, I suggest placing a resistor across the output of the regulator without the Arduino connected (to simulate the load of the Arduino), place an oscilloscope on the output and toggle the input power. Look for any momentary voltage spikes that pop up, then settle down to the normal voltage.

If you see spikes, then do NOT connect the regulator and Arduino as I suggested above.

This is very unlikely, but better safe than sorry.

If you see spikes get a can "SpikesAway".

raschemmel:
If you see spikes get a can "SpikesAway".

LOL!

One must read the label carefully
because the can has two
terminals!