voltage sensor ask!

I have this voltage sensor it is say max 25V my battery give max 25.2V I can burn it for an overrun 0.2V?

voltsensor.jpg

I dot't think that those 0.2V matter too much. Is this a car battery?

treehugger:
I dot’t think that those 0.2V matter too much. Is this a car battery?

no lipo battery 6S 3.7v per cell , in foul charge it is 4.2 per cell so it is 25.2v

Judging from what I see on the picture I think this sensor is not really a sensor but a simple voltage divider. As the 0.2V are within the variation of usual resistors (metal film, 1%) I would also say that you can try it without destroying anything. But you can also build your own voltage divider with two resistors easily so replacing that board is probably the better way.

pylon:
Judging from what I see on the picture I think this sensor is not really a sensor but a simple voltage divider. As the 0.2V are within the variation of usual resistors (metal film, 1%) I would also say that you can try it without destroying anything. But you can also build your own voltage divider with two resistors easily so replacing that board is probably the better way.

ok thank you

pylon:
Judging from what I see on the picture I think this sensor is not really a sensor but a simple voltage divider. As the 0.2V are within the variation of usual resistors (metal film, 1%) I would also say that you can try it without destroying anything. But you can also build your own voltage divider with two resistors easily so replacing that board is probably the better way.

The only problem, is that the usual R12 resistor values do not provide suitable values ratios to make a 1:10 division, nor a 1:25 division.
I always have to make corrections in software.

It is always a good idea to use analogreference (INTERNAL), which gives you a measuring range of 0..1,1V for the ADC, which is not dependent on the fluctuating value of Vcc.