Want to Make a Hydroponic Garden Controller

Hi, I'm new to Arduino. I'm trying to make a Hydroponic Garden Controller. What I need it to do is control 5 110vac pumps. 3 are small fountain pumps to pump water thru the system, and 2 are aquarium air pumps to aerate the nutrient reservoirs. I want to be able to run the water pumps 3 times a day for a specified amount of time. The air pumps will come on twice a day for a longer period of time. I also want indicator lites on each pump so I know, with a glance, which system is running. The controller will be mounted in my garage next to the AC supply, and than wires for each component will be piped out to the appropriate system. Would this be possible with a Arduino Uno card and a 8 or 12 channel relay (expansion for future) board? ANy help will be appreciated. I have found some insight into this system on controlling lights, but I would like to make sure this would work.

Thanks,

Chris.

Have you seen this thread?

Yes, I have seen that video on you tube. Thats a pretty cool setup, but I'm more interested in controller on/off times for pumps at different times of day for a a determined amount of time for each cycle.

An on-board RTC using the Time and TimeAlarms libraries might be a good place to start.

It doesn’t have to be that precise, you can do it with mills. A Real Time Clock can make it on the money. Yes it’s doable. A lot of the relays that you find for the Arduino have reverse logic. They are off when the pin is HIGH (NC) and on when the pin is LOW (NO).

There is a jumper that can be removed so you can power the repay coils from an external power source and not put such a load on your Arduino.

Attached are a couple of the relay boards.

Relay x 16.jpg

Relay x 8.jpg

I've been reading a bunch and looking at videos. I think I have a good start now. One more question though, after you have the boards programmed, can the laptop be disconnected from the board and the program will still run, or do I need a full time laptop connected to it?

I built this exact project for my electrical engineering final project I used an 8 channel relay board, two pumps, several temp sensors, a humidity sensor, a fan and two peristaltic dosing pumps. I used the millis command however I think i will add a real time clock when I get the chance. You do not need to keep your computer connected, the controller will take care of everything without the computer.

I just started reading some of the codes. I've been looking at the millis commands and the time clocks. I'm going to order a starter kit and start seeing how far I can go. Good thing is, I have all winter to create this. I will keep updating as I go. THanks so far for the help! You guys are great!

Thanks,

Chris...

CBHydro:
I've been reading a bunch and looking at videos. I think I have a good start now. One more question though, after you have the boards programmed, can the laptop be disconnected from the board and the program will still run, or do I need a full time laptop connected to it?

once you up=load the program to the Arduino, you can remove the laptop, but you have to provide power.
often a 9 volt power source to the barrel pin. or you might be able to use an old 5v cell phone charger to your USB port or the Vin pins.

Here is a list I figured I start out with.

SainSmart 8-Channel Relay Module
Arduino / Genuino UNO
I2C RTC DS1307 Real Time Clock Module for (For Arduino) (1 x LIR2032)

I found a starter kit at adafruit that I think I am going to order. Does this look like I'm heading in the right direction?

dave-in-nj:
to use an old 5v cell phone charger to your USB port or the Vin pins.

The latter is not a good idea, indeed no better than putting the phone charger on the barrel jack. VIN is essentially a power output point and and the IN indicates that it is the voltage applied at the input, i.e. the barrel jack, and if used as an input requires the same minimum of 7v.

CBHydro:
Here is a list I figured I start out with.

SainSmart 8-Channel Relay Module
Arduino / Genuino UNO
I2C RTC DS1307 Real Time Clock Module for (For Arduino) (1 x LIR2032)

I found a starter kit at adafruit that I think I am going to order. Does this look like I'm heading in the right direction?

I submit that starter kits are for presents from aunties, or for people who don't know what they are doing. You have clear goals and would be better off getting the parts to that end, rather than spend money on stuff you don't need.

You need to consider how the stuff goes together, particularly the clock, and I don't think the choice of clock is a good one anyway. The DS1307 is not famous for its accuracy. I have several and I wouldn't hear a word said against them - until I used one in an external environment rather like I imagine you intend. That is when you find out how they are subject to temperature differences. Further, I believe typical DS1307s are more intended for use on proto shields, which you have apparently not considered using and may not need to. The DS3231 is more stable in varying temperatures, hence more accurate, costs only a dollar or two more, and usually comes with longer pins more suitable for jumper ribbons.