Wattage of a TO220 type package 1.8ohm resistor?

Any guesses on the aprox. wattage of a TO220 type packaged, 1.8ohm resistor?

I've never seen a 1.8 ohm resistor packaged in a TO220 package, so I don't have a clue to its wattage rating. Don't suppose you have a link to a datasheet?

Lefty

all I know about it is based on what is written on it:


[picture of us resistor symbol] 1R8

AJ[Square turned '45deg' w/ a 'N'in center]8X

[2 Outter most pins exist, no evidence of center pin] | | | | | | | |

also if anyone has any idea how to draw enough current from an ATX on the 3V3 rail to keep it on let me know... (I cant use a load resistor, as the only high wattage resistors I have are 1Kohms and up.)

12volt 20watt halogen light bulb connected to the 3V3 will draw around 750mA which should be enough current and it won't get too hot. But no doubt the purists will say it doesn't run hot enough for the halogen/element regeneration process to work properly.

jackrae: 12volt 20watt halogen light bulb connected to the 3V3 will draw around 750mA which should be enough current and it won't get too hot. But no doubt the purists will say it doesn't run hot enough for the halogen/element regeneration process to work properly.

Thanks will consider it, however I would have to steel from my dads car repair kit at the moment, and I don't want to get him mad...

..the to-220 max rating is ~1W w/o heatsink and 100W with good heatsink. Yes there are resistor in to-220, for high frequency usage (low inductance). BTW, google knows answers as well..

pito: ..the to-220 max rating is ~1W w/o heatsink and 100W with good heatsink. Yes there are resistor in to-220, for high frequency usage (low inductance). BTW, google knows answers as well..

Yeah, but google is not as friendly as a real person..

pito: ..the to-220 max rating is ~1W w/o heatsink and 100W with good heatsink. Yes there are resistor in to-220, for high frequency usage (low inductance).

What type of heatsink would be good for using it as a dummy load, @ 3V3 to 3V8?

The power would be "E squared over R" or 3.3*3.3 = 11 / 1.8 = about 6 watts. So 3 to 6 square inches of heatsink area. Maybe an old Pentium heatsink, or something you can scrounge??