Weatherproofing a distance sensor

I would like to construct a parking assistant. The principal obstacle is a garage door pillar, which has an external surface. It’s a sharp turn to pull into this garage, and hitting the pillar is a distinct possibility (read: I’ve done it).

I have a Ping))) sensor (http://www.parallax.com/product/28015) which works very well… but doesn’t claim to be rainproof.

An electrical box might work, with two holes drilled for the Ping))) sensor’s speaker/mic (I’m assuming those are what the two big circles on it are). However I’m unsure if the speaker/mic are actually safe to get wet.

Any suggestions?

MaxBotics have IP67 protected ultrasonic sensors.. not cheap though

I want to build an ultrasonic anemometer, so I just ordered some of these on eBay (from China)...

2PCS 10MM 40KHZ Waterproof Ultrasonic Sensor Receiver Transmitter R+T In 1

lar3ry:
I want to build an ultrasonic anemometer, so I just ordered some of these on eBay (from China)...

I hope you realize that those are just the transducers, and that you will need to build the appropriate sending and receiving circuitry (not an easy task by a long-shot - but, if you have the skills and tools - namely an oscilloscope and a frequency/function generator - it is possible).

TeaTrolley:
Any suggestions?

Go on Ebay; search for "reverse backup sensor" - you will find a ton of mostly similar kits meant for installation on automobiles, that basically help to alert a driver when they are getting too close to an obstacle as they drive in reverse. These kits contain weatherproof ultrasonic transducers and a custom driver system (and LED/LCD display plus sound) to show distance to obstacles.

Now - you could use such a kit as-is - just install it on the front of the vehicle - but you probably want to do this yourself.

If you google around for "reverse backup sensor arduino" (along with other terms) - you'll find a few articles out there on how to hack these cheap sensor systems to get the range data out of the interface box. Alternatively, you could use the sensor transducers by themselves with a custom interface circuit; though this isn't a trivial task (and requires some extra tools on the bench to have the best chance of success: a function generator and an oscilloscope).

cr0sh:

lar3ry:
I want to build an ultrasonic anemometer, so I just ordered some of these on eBay (from China)…

I hope you realize that those are just the transducers, and that you will need to build the appropriate sending and receiving circuitry (not an easy task by a long-shot - but, if you have the skills and tools - namely an oscilloscope and a frequency/function generator - it is possible).

I do indeed. I probably should have mentioned it to the OP.