What are people's "Day Jobs" on here?

Hi there,

I summed up my question in the title, I'd just like to hear what people do for a living (assuming that their use of Arduino is mostly a hobby), or if they're out of work or a student. I hope people don't mind. I'm studying Computer Engineering, BTW. Thank you,

-David

DavidChipman: Hi there,

I summed up my question in the title, I'd just like to hear what people do for a living (assuming that their use of Arduino is mostly a hobby), or if they're out of work or a student. I hope people don't mind. I'm studying Computer Engineering, BTW. Thank you,

-David

Well being happily retired, this is my day job. ;)

Lefty

DavidChipman: I summed up my question in the title, I'd just like to hear what people do for a living (assuming that their use of Arduino is mostly a hobby), or if they're out of work or a student. I hope people don't mind. I'm studying Computer Engineering, BTW. Thank you,

I consider myself a professional software developer - give me problem to solve, stick me in front of a computer, and I will come up with a solution.

Currently, I am employed as a LAMP web developer in the marketing department for an international manufacturing corporation.

I started my first software development job about 9 months out of high school. I don't have a college degree, though I wish I did - but at 40 years of age with a mortgage, that isn't likely to happen. A lack of a college degree hasn't stopped me in my career advancement, though (I do have a technical school associates degree in computer electronics - for what its worth).

Since my school days I work in the R&D of international high tech companies in a multidisciplinary team primary as software developer and also some market study, electronics, sensors, physics, and even some chemistry.

I've been a hardware designer, down at the chip level, for high speed memory systems.

I've been working on the GCC compiler since 1988 (with 2 years off at other compiler companies). I'm at IBM, and currently, I and others on my team are adding support for the future power8 processor. I've lost track of the random processors I have worked on over the years, but I have worked on powerpc, x86, MIPS, cell, ns32k, FR-V, Motorola 88000, and others.

Note, while I work on GCC for my day job, I don't do anything with the AVR or ARM ports used in Arduino builds, other than when I worked on the cell, I added some infrastructure that is used by the latest releases for AVR PROGMEM support (but the Arduino releases, don't yet use that compiler).

If you need something fixed, go through official channels to report the bug (and of course, get the Arduino team to upgrade to a newer compiler that has the fix). What I do on Arduino/Teensy/Rasberry PI is strictly hobby and for fun.

My title is “Engineering Technician”, I work for a smallish electronics company making prototypes (and fixing designs), running validation tests, gathering statical data, operating the lab machinery, and designing test fixtures for the production lines.

MichaelMeissner: I've been working on the GCC compiler since 1988

You know, when you first popped into this forum, I thought your name seemed familiar - I'm not sure that this (GCC) is where I am placing it from, but maybe? Cool either way! :D

Florist.

cr0sh:

MichaelMeissner: I've been working on the GCC compiler since 1988

You know, when you first popped into this forum, I thought your name seemed familiar - I'm not sure that this (GCC) is where I am placing it from, but maybe? Cool either way! :D

In the past, I also have contributed to the Olympus photography forums (dpreview.com, fourthirdsphoto.com, 43rumors.com). For various reasons, I tend to lurk there a lot more frequently than posting currently than I did in the past. I also have posted at some of the camera equipment forums for triggertrap, capture clip, etc.

Or maybe you remember me from various renaissance faire/steampunk facebook groups.

Basket weaver...just kidding. ;)

I am an aerospace engineer employed by the USAF. I really like the Arduino and other related DIY products since it is one of my few opportunities to actually have hands-on engineering. My job as an engineer is more hands-off and is more closely related to a program manager.

software designer specialising in databases qualified in electronics "a while back" I remember the discussions in the learned press (none of this forum rubbish in them days) about whether transistors would ever catch on :)

Theoretical physics student. Just entered grad school though.

http://careers.state.gov/specialist/vacancy-announcements/seo

Kicked out of high school aged 17, never went back to an institution of learning (or any other type of institution for that matter unless you count a night in the Townsville watch house).

Travelled around and lived in various parts of Oz and the world for about 9 years, during which time I was a photographer and darkroom technician for the most part, working in London, Perth, Canberra and for a New York stock agency. But I also worked at whatever was necessary to get by, garbage man (in the days when you ran behind the truck), barman (in a rough pub on the docks), plumber, labourer, carpenter, safe-hand diplomatic bag courier, golf course groundsman, clerk, farm hand etc etc.

Then met my missus while I was photographing wildlife in Kenya and had to settle down. Actually I didn't "have" to but was a bit tired of owning nothing but a backpack and a $100 car and having my cameras in the pawn shop.

Got interested in electronics circa 1980, got a job based on some schematics, lots of enthusiasm and some BS and learnt as I went. Moved into embedded processors soon after, had a product on the market (EPROM emulator), worked as a SW/HW engineer for Prime computer's comms R&D section, SW engineer for SPL on the SSANAME product (which you've never heard of but your immigration/police/taxman probably has) and twice as SW/HW engineer for a small company you've never heard of. Inventer of the year in my state at one point. Started getting back into photography in the 90s. Ran landscape workshops and owned a small gallery from which I sold my large-format (5x4" negs) B&W prints. Was represented by the same poster company that handled Ansel Adams posters.

Retired at 45, built a large motorhome on a 6x6 Army truck, sold everything and hit the road.

That was 14 years ago, been travelling around Oz pretty much ever since, occupying myself photographing wildlife and writing articles for photo magazines. Then about 3 years ago felt the urge to get back into embedded electronics and did so.

These days I just tinker with stuff but lately have been doing some contract circuit and PCB design work plus I just finished an Arduino driver library for a company.

Apart from that naff all really. Man where does the time go?


Rob

TheKitty:
http://careers.state.gov/specialist/vacancy-announcements/seo

heh SEO is also those jerkwads that spam your blog 150 times an hour telling you how great your post was but they could make you #1 on google if you only provide credit information

heh SEO is also those jerkwads that spam your blog 150 times an hour telling you how great your post was but they could make you #1 on google if you only provide credit information

Different SEO

Photographer, carpenter, recently back-to-school student, artist, consultant, actor..... avid problem-solver.

We had a "TRS-80 Model 1" in my house when I was born (1970's). I remember writing & playing games in BASIC (and saving/loading them with a cassette tape recorder!) before I was 6. Ha...the Arduino UNO has more memory in that single chip than that TRS-80 had with a pizza-box sized expansion chassis attached! Built my first 3 PC's myself (8088, 8086...monochrome monitors..5 MB HDD....yes, 'MegaByte')

I finished my studies as a Music Composer (like "classical music"...), about 10 years ago. I have worked a couple of years as a Music Theory Teacher but then decided to go abroad for one year and do some volunteer work. I ended up living and working on a Camphill Community with people with special needs (mostly Down Syndrom and Autism) and i LOOOOVED it. So i stayed for some years. During this time i also worked in several projects as a composer (just for the fun of it!), like this one: The Four Elements (i wrote the music and worked on the performances) http://4elements.netai.net/

Meanwhile i met "the woman of my dreams" and i moved once again to a new country: Germany. Now i am thinking about going next year again to study. I'm thinking about Interactive Media Design... any ideas about it? Something to do with electronics would also be nice, but i'm not sure i have the required baggage to do it.

Hmmm, day job? Dreamer! 8)

I teach physics. Been doing that for a little over a decade now. Arduino brought me to electronics and open source hardware. All that age-old C knowledge became useful (too bad x86 assembly wasn't useful). I write arduino libraries, design and sell shields and modules, do projects (hobby based, open source physics lab platform or just paid software/hardware work). College kids should learn with arduino if they want to be future scientists or engineers.

As for cr0sh, I bet colleges in your great state may also accept life experience for credits as in my great state (even at some discounted rate) and rubber stamp you if you write them a check. College degrees decades ago were golden tickets to a good job/life but now is not much more than a receipt of payment, unless your resume says more than just paying tuition.

Oh, by the way, I didn't find Arduino. It found me. An art professor introduced me to Arduino out of the blue.