What are the different schematic types called?

On the Arduino Project Hub, I have seen two different types of schematics. I have seen normal schematics, using the normal symbols and everything. I also see many schematics that show an accurate visual representation of what the circuit should look like, and It shows an image of the breadboard, the Arduino, etc. What are these kinds of schematics called?

Mostly, the latter are called "junk", but I believe the proper name is "Fritzing"

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Isn't fritzing just the name of the application used to create the diagrams though?

Yep.
"Fritzing diagrams", if you wish, but "junk" is shorter.

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Ah ok. Thank you!

I call the second type, diagrams. The diagrams are junk because they usually leave out so much information that would be on a good schematic. Generic parts without pin numbers or names (functions), parts without values (or worse, wrong values). jumbles of intersecting wires, ambiguous polarities and so on. Maybe 1 in 10 are actually useful because it is simple and the author took the time to make it readable.

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What is "Normal schematics"?

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Something like this, for example:

While a fritzing/diagram/junk would look like this:

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Right, but Fritzing can do more.. Most users simply don't know that and how it's possible to create circuit diagrams as well.

A well planned circuit diagram or schematic has -

  • Voltages from +highest at the top to -lowest at the bottom.
  • Signal flow from left to right
  • Standardised symbols & designations. [LINK]
  • Minimal number of ‘wires’ or lines crossing over, or clearly defined.
  • Colour is optional. It should be clear in itself

If you draw like this, you’ll have a lot more friends , and love yourself when it comes time to repair.

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We have a "wall of shame" in the bar sports forum. Mostly useless with the new forum.

Fritrig does offer real schematic view. Few use it properly.

In many ways, the new forum reminds me of Fritzing - confusing, with low-density information

Last time I tried it, the "real schematic" editor was very difficult to use (or at least, very difficult to get a well-formatted "real schematic" out of.

It does make nice pictures of protoboards...

There was a post here recently, which had a particularly awful Fritzing Diagram, and this inspired me to start a collection of the worst ones. Unfortunately the author of that noteworthy one deleted it before I could get a decent screen shot. However, there are still a few interesting ones: Fritzing Diagram - Rogues Gallery

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@gangsta_gaming: to answer your question, you are referring a "wiring diagram".

The circuit diagram (or "schematic") uses abstract symbols to represent electronic components and their interconnections, laid out in a way that represents the functionality of the circuit.

The wiring diagram uses symbols - often life-like - of electronic components, connectors, wires, etc, and shows the physical layout of the circuit. Wiring diagrams make no attempt to explain the functionality of the circuit - they are there to assist the person building it.

Wiring diagrams are not "junk". Fritzing diagrams are not "junk". They do the job they are intended for: showing you how to wire up the physical components. HOWEVER, as wiring diagrams make no attempt to show the functionality of the circuit, they are pretty much useless when discussing how a circuit works, what it is supposed to do, why it doesn't work, how to improve it, etc.

That is why they are unpopular in this forum: wiring diagrams don't contain the kind of information most people need to understand what the circuit does, and to offer help with it.

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. . . and a decent, hand drawn example by @ArduinoStarter1 found on [SOLVED] Uncontrolled behaviour while compiling - #17 by ArduinoStarter1

ArduinoStarter1

I’d disagree about Fritzing diagrams…
A good wiring diagram isn’t junk, but it looks very little like a Fritzy.

Example…
ONE, TWO, even THREE or FOUR, and FIVE

A wiring diagram will often have the pin layout arranged as it appears on the device itself.
EXAMPLE EXAMPLE

A schematic, or circuit tends to have the layout arranged to suggest/reinforce the actual signal flow rather than the cosmetic appearance.

In some cases, a block diagram is see to simplify the schematic, losing specific pin descriptors… focussing on the signal / control oaths through the device.

BLOCK DIAGRAM

Do you intend to collect a gallery of funny schematics? For exampe Relay Module

The main with fritzrig is the beginner.

Parts too far apart.
Not rotated for ease of wiring tracing
Not using nets

My favorite is
" i couldn't find my ESP32 board so i used a Teensy as it had the same pin count"

And
" it wouldn't accept my power adapter so i used a 9v battery but it would not let me connect to Vin ..

Broken link?