What does one degree equivent means?(Not really related to Arduino...)

Hi! I was wondering if anyone knows what one degree equivent means? This question might not be related to Arduino at all but it will definitely help with my Arduino coding when doing calculations. Thank you!

Could you please provide a reference or link to which this term is mentioned?

Southpark: Could you please provide a reference or link to which this term is mentioned?

Thanks for the reply. I do not have any link or reference to this term mentioned because I am continuing on the project of another person. The person only wrote the one degree equivent as one of the comments beside the codes which I do not know what is the meaning of it too. :)

I see. You might need to show a few lines of the code, in order for somebody to determine what they meant ...... or at least attempt to determine what it meant.

two things

1) when referencing a thing, works of others, it is proper to post the context in full, or a link, or more than enough of the usage so that it can offer a very solid reference to others

2) people make notes that are meaningful to themselves, and sometimes, only to that person.

all we can do is take wild guesses.

if you have a linear temperature sensors, LM35.... bring it into your ADC on an analog input.... scale it,.... and turn it into an integer...... each volt =

ngjy: Thanks for the reply. I do not have any link or reference to this term mentioned because I am continuing on the project of another person. The person only wrote the one degree equivent as one of the comments beside the codes which I do not know what is the meaning of it too. :

How is writing code, (not really related to Arduino...) ?

Thanks everyone for your valuable replies. I am actually very new to the project so I do not really understand much of the project and is currently learning more about it. The line of code provided is as follows:

double oneDegree = 2180/360 //one degree equivent

Seems like it may be fairly self explanatory. There are 360 degrees in a circle so in this code 2180/360 which equals 6.0555 represents one degree. They left the math so you can see how it was derived.

Hutkikz: Seems like it may be fairly self explanatory. There are 360 degrees in a circle so in this code 2180/360 which equals 6.0555 represents one degree. They left the math so you can see how it was derived.

Thanks for the reply. But why do we need to take 2180 to divide by 360 instead of other values? Thank you!

It is very common to way to translate a sensor reading or such, but would have to see the rest of the code to know.

You should keep all posts regarding a single project in one thread.

Hutkikz: It is very common to way to translate a sensor reading or such, but would have to see the rest of the code to know.

You should keep all posts regarding a single project in one thread.

Okay thanks so much for all the information!

"2180/360"

If a rotating device has a sensor that generates a total of 2180 pulses over a span of 360 degrees (ie. as it travels 1 full revolution around a circle), then it could mean that it would take 2180/360 pulses (ie. 6.0555555555...... pulses) to cover 1 degree of circular travel. But, of course, the sensor only works with FULL counts of pulses...... so it would probably make better sense if another quantity were used instead ...... which is 360/2180. This would simply translate to approximately 0.16514 degree between two consecutive pulses.

I believe that there is a common type of stepper motor with a built in gearbox that takes 2180 steps to do aomplete revolution.

This calculation would then give the number of steps needed to move the output shaft through 1 degree. (and it isn't an integer).

Southpark: "2180/360"

If a rotating device has a sensor that generates a total of 2180 pulses over a span of 360 degrees (ie. as it travels 1 full revolution around a circle), then it could mean that it would take 2180/360 pulses (ie. 6.0555555555...... pulses) to cover 1 degree of circular travel. But, of course, the sensor only works with FULL counts of pulses...... so it would probably make better sense if another quantity were used instead ...... which is 360/2180. This would simply translate to approximately 0.16514 degree between two consecutive pulses.

Thank You for the detailed information. I will try using 360/2180 and see the difference. Because now currently, the angle does not seem to be correct. As I set angle=0 for moving forward but sometimes when moving forward the angle returned to me is more than 45 degrees which I intend to add in the condition if the angle is more than 45 degrees I will let the robot turn either to the right or left side.

JohnLincoln: I believe that there is a common type of stepper motor with a built in gearbox that takes 2180 steps to do aomplete revolution.

This calculation would then give the number of steps needed to move the output shaft through 1 degree. (and it isn't an integer).

Thanks for the information! :)