What is a jack plug

Hello,

I am new to arduino and am currently learning via a book. The book mentions something known as a jack plug as a component I need to buy? What is a jack plug?

Here's the book's version of it: http://cl.ly/image/2P2b1h403t30 http://cl.ly/image/1f2p2H3B023a

Would this be the physical equivalent of this:?

https://www.sparkfun.com/products/8032

Worried because it says it's an "audio" jack which i'm not sure is what I need

Thanks

I guess the 2nd link leads to the project you're at right now ? This is a barrel jack (click !), which is probably what you're looking for. Your Arduino is likely to have one too.

So for this project would these suffice?

DC Motor: http://www.oddwires.com/3-6v-dc-miniature-motor/

TIP120 Transistor: http://ca.mouser.com/ProductDetail/STMicroelectronics/TIP120/?qs=ljbEvF4DwOPl3O93r6IAPg==

1n4001 Diode: https://www.sparkfun.com/products/8589

Jack Plug: http://www.adafruit.com/blog/2011/05/31/new-product-breadboard-friendly-2-1mm-dc-barrel-jack/

External Power Supply: https://www.sparkfun.com/products/9835

Thanks

Seems OK to me. See the plug on the battery holder ? That plugs into the barrel jack i pointed to and you have in your list. That motor is very small. The shop does not mention any kind of current this motor requires, and that is a very important item to select the motor and the other components, especially the transistor, on.

I think I'll do some research then. I dunno, this book bothers me. Tells me to get the parts, make he circuit but doesn't explain why these parts work why I need this particular version of the component.

seal308: I dunno, this book bothers me. Tells me to get the parts, make he circuit but doesn't explain why these parts work why I need this particular version of the component.

Because of that remark, i downloaded the book and had a look at it. As these books go, this one isn't bad at all. The transistor is discussed a few pages further (page 101), but within this project. No doubt not everything that can be told about transistors is discussed here, you can fill entire libraries and still not cover everything.

My advice: Read the entire section before you start building or experimenting with your project.

And start reading from page 1, don't start at the first project that interests you (i'm not saying you didn't or blaming you for anything here). The further you progress in the book, the more is assumed you read the previous content and learned from that. Maybe tedious, but that's how the book (any book) was written.

seal308: I think I'll do some research then. I dunno, this book bothers me. Tells me to get the parts, make he circuit but doesn't explain why these parts work why I need this particular version of the component.

It doesn't really matter what type of socket you get so long as you have a matching plug for the power supply (or whatever's connected to it).

You do not need the jack plug and socket in the first place. All you need is a battery holder with wires that have tinned bare wire on the end that you can insert directly into your breadboard.

There are two conveniences in the "barrel jack". One is to disconnect when (to save batteries) you do not want to operate the device, or for safety whilst you arrange or re-arrange the wiring. If however you have a battery pack with a switch, that is already taken care of.

The other and principal use is when you are using a "plug pack" power supply (preferably a regulated switchmode supply) which usually comes fitted with this sort of connector (though nowadays there are many different sizes of connector other than that with the 2.1 mm pin which is used in the Arduino).

The 'male' part is the jack (or plug) the 'female' part is the socket. (Biology and electronics combined)

If the jack is on the end of a flying lead it is a "free" jack if it is part of a surface or board mounting it is a "fixed" jack

Similarly if the socket is on a flying lead it is a "free" socket and if it is part of a surface or board mounting it is a "fixed" socket

I once had to explain the difference between male and female threaded components to my secretary - she was rather embarrassed when the penny dropped.

jackrae: I once had to explain the difference between male and female threaded components to my secretary - she was rather embarrassed when the penny dropped.

Heh, heh, a week or two back, my secretary was telling me she had been "pregnancy testing" her cows.

In case this is not common knowledge, it involves a particularly long rubber glove. And a skill she learned at the age of fifteen.

Plugs and sockets? Pshaw!

Regards the "barrel jack", I tend to consider the line part a (female) socket and the chassis part a (male) plug. It depends I suppose, on your sense of proportion. :D

Well, then this must be an interesting case, as both connectors seem to be of the hermaphrodite kind...

MAS3: Well, then this must be an interesting case, as both connectors seem to be of the hermaphrodite kind...

Snails?

Should i really explain this ?