What kind of switch do I need?

So this is my first dive into any of this stuff (programming, electronics and whatnot.). I am so glad I found about Arduino boards before I got to deep into this project.

I own a 1 channel Orange Dark Terror (http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/DarkTerror) guitar amplifier and I want to automate the knobs in order to simulate having a multi channel amp, in order to be able to switch from my clean sound to my overdriven sound (almost) instantaneously in a live setting.

I have ordered an Uno Rev3 and am currently stuck with what I would need next. My goal is to end up with a clean stomp box (http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/FS3X), maybe 3 or 4 switches depending on how many sounds I decide I want. But I basically want to be able to step on 'Switch A' and have some sort of mechanism that will turn my knobs to 'Position A', step on 'Switch B and knobs go to 'Position B' and so on.

I was think servos mounted and attached to the knobs to turn them, I'm open to ideas so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

But my current issue is that I have no clue what kind of switch I would need to do this. I know what style of switch I would like (http://www.mammothelectronics.com/category-s/32.htm) I just don't know how many poles or throws or momentary, normally closed or anything to accomplish said task.

So step 1 is to figure out what I need in order to move forward with this project. Any and all help is appreciated!

I suggest a Single Pole Single Throw Momentary. It will need to be heavy duty since your stomping it. I would go with 4SFSSPST-M on that page. What you need to do is just send a signal to the Arduino to tell it to start doing something (such as moving a servo).

Since you can just get an overdrive pedal for your amp, I wondered about your desire to do this, but then I thought: wouldn't it be really cool to make a pedal which does not instantaneously rotate to high-gain/overdrive, but rather does it slowly as you are playing notes. You could even make it drift in and out of overdrive at various speeds for a wavy effect. I think you could make some pretty cool tunes. Check this out: http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=61586.0

Thanks for the response on that. I had no clue what I needed and now I have a good starting point.

dmjlambert: Since you can just get an overdrive pedal for your amp, I wondered about your desire to do this

My reason for doing this is because when I purchased my amp, it was only for home recording purposes. I had no need to switch from clean to overdriven on the fly. But now that I have a band I would prefer to use my Dark Terror which is a tube amp which gives me an amazing distorted sound which is as pure as a sound as you can get without adding more "noise" into your signal like you would through a pedal that does it digitally. Most amps that you would buy for playing live has multiple channels, usually a clean channel, and 1 or 2 distortion channels that you can switch through by using the supplied footswitch like the one I posted earlier.

But like I mentioned, my amp was pretty much designed for recording purposes so there is only one channel, and the music we play will require me to switch from a clean to an overdriven sound pretty frequently.

dmjlambert: wouldn't it be really cool to make a pedal which does not instantaneously rotate to high-gain/overdrive, but rather does it slowly as you are playing notes. You could even make it drift in and out of overdrive at various speeds for a wavy effect.

I will DEFINITELY be experimenting with that. I never would have thought of that and you can definitely get some really cool effects with it.

Thanks for your help, i'll keep this post updated as I make progress with this. Now I just need my board to get shipped so I can start experimenting. So pumped!

BFezuk: tube amp which gives me an amazing distorted sound which is as pure as a sound as you can get

That's one hell of a contradiction!

Russell.

Quite. Lol. What I should have said is that the analog distortion created by the amps tube is a much cleaner signal (not necessarily cleaner sound) with less "noise" than what you would get from a pedal that creates the sound digitally lol.

On another note, I was thinking of another way to make this pedal. Instead of have multiple single switches, that when pressed, would tell the board to move the servo to a certain position, what if I had 2 sets of 2 pots that would correspond to the volume and gain knobs on my amp. So, if the pedal is pressed to, we'll call it "Channel 2", servos would turn my knobs to match the positions that you would set by turning the pots on the "Channel 2" section of the pedal.

Step on the pedal again to return to "Channel 1" and the servos turn the knobs to match the pots on the pedal for "Channel 1"

Is something like this even possible with an Uno R3? Or would coding the board to do this be way over my head? lol

It won't be over your head after you dive in and learn some of the programming. You can hook up pots and do that because the Arduino has analog inputs which can read pots.

There's all sorts of stuff you will find you can do. You don't "need" pots, it just depends on what you want the human interface of the box to be like and whether you want to reach down with your fingers and make adjustments. One of the first thoughts I had about your project is making a stomp box with several switches, and the function of switches can be expanded by making them do different things if they are pressed and held for a while, or double- or triple-tapped, etc. You could accept a triple-tap on one of the switches to put the pedal in "learn" mode and stomp and hold a switch while the servo turns the gain up or down slowly, and when you release, it stores that setting. You're going to get all sorts of ideas like that just from playing with the Arduino.

That's definitely good to know. I've been looking watching TONS of videos on youtube and can't wait to start messing around. Next paycheck i'm going to get all of my other supplies to really get into it.

You don't "need" pots, it just depends on what you want the human interface of the box to be like

My main reason for the pots and the human interface of the pedal came about after I was thinking about if I needed to change settings, I would have to take the pedal apart and edit my sketch every time I want to tweak my sound. But, if I had pots which corresponded to my knobs which would change depending on which switch (that each have their own pots) I stepped on, I could easily tweak each specific "channel" without a bunch of extra steps. I figure it will take a little extra time to code and get everything working in the first place, but then it's easier in the long haul.

But as for the sweeping knobs, and stuff, I'm thinking of making that a completely different setup, and once I'm more comfortable with all of this, I'll make an all encompassing mega pedal lol.