What makes an Arduino an Arduino?

Hi,

maybe a Little philosophical question;-)

I read, that when i mak a Derivate of an original Arduino (e.g. the UNO), i need to publish the layout etc. but what exactly is a derivate? especially the UNO is made of quite less Standard components. so what makes the arduino-brand? or is it just the usage together with the arduino bootloader?

I read, that when i mak a Derivate of an original Arduino (e.g. the UNO), i need to publish the layout etc.

"Need"? No. The license allows you to make derivatives with no requirement that you publish the schematic / layout.

The Arduino IDE itself is released under the GPL, so modifications to that do need to make the source available...

In the faq they write: "we release all of the original design files (Eagle CAD) for the Arduino hardware. These files are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license, which allows for both personal and commercial derivative works, as long as they credit Arduino and release their designs under the same license."

Doesn't that mean that i need to publish changes??

[quote author=Coding Badly link=msg=2323457 date=1437427496] "Need"? No. The license allows you to make derivatives with no requirement that you publish the schematic / layout.

[/quote]

Ah, my mistake. I apologize.

However, the license is actually vague on whether or not your adapted content has to be provided to your audience. It is clear that you have to provide a compatible license and that you have to include attribution. But no mention of providing "source". Strange.

In any case, it is in the Arduino-spirit to publish derivative work. In other words, be awesome to each other.

It's a little tough to define "derivative work" when there is so little "design" to most Arduinos - it's basically a breakout board for an Atmega328p. I mean, there are boards that are clearly derivative (like the "Freeduino", or the Adafruit "metro" and "lilypad".) But I'd say that the 1284 or STM32 boards from various place are NOT derivative enough to come under the "share-alike" provisions...