What sketch size on Arduino Pro Mini 8Mhz with an ISP-programmer?

Update:

I tried also to increase all the values max_write_delay to 16000 in the avrdude.conf file (for the ATmega328 board only) as reported here.
Again... no success.

VERIFICATION ERROR SOLVED!

It is an electrical problem.
As you know, 99% of USBasp circuits have multiple pins on the IDC-10 connector marked as GND:

In my previous post I've suggested to use pin #10 for the ground line, seems that I was wrong.
Don't ask me why, but I've simply moved the ground terminal from pin #10 to pin #8 and... it works!

For testing I've uploaded big sketches (30K), as well as small sketches (from the examples directory). No more verification errors.
If I move back the ground terminal to its old position on pin #10 then... bang! Verification error again.>:(

I have no voltmeter at home, but I strongly suspect that the pin #10 (marked as GND) is not at 0 volt at all. This doesn't allow the circuitry to properly work.
The lesson is: don't buy cheap chinese copies! The quality is really poor. >:(

Just for the sake of curiosity, I'm going to buy an official USBasp programmer made by Thomas Fischl.

P.S.
It could be that many verification errors reported in the forum are due to the same reason.

Glad you got it solved! How did you have your USBasp connected to the Pro Mini?

I usually use a 6 pin USBasp. I do own one of the 10 pin models. I’ve never had a problem using it but I use it with a 10 to 6 pin adapter. That adapter connects all ground pins from the 10 pin connector to the ground pin on the 6 pin connector.

I see the verification error problem reported frequently on the forum and it seems like it’s rarely resolved. I’ve only ever encountered the error with the USBtinyISP.

As posted before (see the page 1 of this thread), the wiring is the same as reported here.

If you search for an "USBasp programmer" on ebay then 95% of results is about a programmer with a 10 pin connector.
I wasn't even aware that an official version was existing. I discovered the website fischl.de only after the purchase.

Note: the official version by Thomas Fischl is sold with a 10-pins connector too.

The 6 pin USBasp is a little more expensive than the 10 pin but once you buy the 6 pin adapter for the 10 pin USBasp those savings are negated and I find the 10 pin cable + adapter to be much more awkward to work with since almost all of my boards use the 6 pin ICSP header.

I've heard some talk of using the extra pins on the 10 pin connector to allow the USBasp to also act as a USB-TTL serial adapter:

The latter link seems to indicate their USBasp already has the necessary connections to the connector, others seem to indicate you need to make the connections yourself so the connections may vary from one USBasp clone to another. The schematic at http://www.fischl.de/usbasp/ does show them connected to pins 4 and 6 of the connector.

This would be very useful since in the Arduino world we're used to being able to flash the microcontroller and communicate over the same USB cable but this requires a bootloader that takes up some of the program memory. If the USBasp could be made to do both then we could have the same functionality over one cable without the need for a bootloader. This functionality would not be terribly useful for standard Arduino boards since they all have the 6 pin ICSP header but of course custom boards could be made with the 10 pin connector.

I think it's a great idea to buy an official USBasp even if only to support the person who created the best ISP programmer for AVRs by far and made it open source.

Hi,

I think that 6 or 10 pins connector is an irrelevant aspect. If you can trust the schematics and/or the pinout of the connector then you can sort out the right wiring in few seconds. Buying a chinese clone put you in a dangerous situation because you don’t know if they made some simplification without considering the collateral effects on the remaining electronic components.

The USBasp+ project seems interesting, but involves some expertise in soldering, compiling, programming, etc. I think not all of “audience” is capable of that.
The ideal situation is when a real, tested and finished product is developed and put on the market. In this sense, I still believe in the capacity (and obstinacy) of single persons more than 1000 open-source projects on the web.

Talking about USBasp, Thomas Fischl has developed an interessant product: a Stand-alone AVR In-System-Programmer. It allows you to flash a chip without the needs of having a computer beside you.
http://www.fischl.de/ispnub/

About counterfeit clones: it would be nice to have original products/accessories made from third-parts evidenced somehow here in the forum. This would support creators and could bring to more successful projects in the future.

P.S.
Maybe the word “counterfeit” is not the right one here, because the schematics of the USBasp are free and the firmware is distributed under the GPL license. I’m not an expert, but it seems that chinese guys can legally make copies of that… or not?

gimpo:
I think that 6 or 10 pins connector is an irrelevant aspect. If you can trust the schematics and/or the pinout of the connector then you can sort out the right wiring in few seconds. Buying a chinese clone put you in a dangerous situation because you don't know if they made some simplification without considering the collateral effects on the remaining electronic components.

6 pin connector is not an irrelevant aspect to me. I use my USBasp a LOT. I'm certainly willing to risk frying a cheap microcontroller on the first test of a $3 USBasp clone in exchange for the convenience of it having the connector I actually use, especially considering that many people have used this exact model of clone without any reported issues other than some limitations of the default firmware that also occur with the official USBasp (which some forum members have solved in an updated version of the firmware). Hardly what I'd call a "dangerous situation".

I've already said I'm in favor of people supporting the creator. There's no need to resort to FUD tactics.

gimpo:
it would be nice to have original products/accessories made from third-parts evidenced somehow here in the forum. This would support creators and could bring to more successful projects in the future.

Could you provide some details of how you see that working?

gimpo:
P.S.
Maybe the word "counterfeit" is not the right one here, because the schematics of the USBasp are free and the firmware is distributed under the GPL license. I'm not an expert, but it seems that chinese guys can legally make copies of that.... or not?

In the case of the programmer I use, it's not even a copy. It's a derivative with what I would consider an improvement (though others who want those serial lines on the connector would not). Certainly it's clear how the USBasp firmware can be used. Regarding the hardware design, open source hardware is a tricky subject, which has been more thoroughly examined since the time of USBasp. How well the GPL 2 license used by USBasp is suited to hardware is debatable but certainly the intent of Thomas Fischl is clearly for both the firmware and hardware design to be open source under that license. The only area that might be disputable is the use of the name USBasp on clones if that is a registered trademark. I don't see that mentioned anywhere on the website. It is my understanding that the firmware on the Chinese USBasp has been modified and nobody has been able to get the source from them so that is potentially a violation of the license if they used open source code in their firmware instead of writing it from scratch. I actually flash my programmers with the improved firmware as soon as I get them.

pert:
Could you provide some details of how you see that working?

First idea coming into my mind is a section in the main folder like the one for "Products". I have no idea what name would be appropriate for it. "Third part products"? "Inventor products?", "Open source products"? "Support this products"? I don't know.
Inside the section there could be a list of the "featured" products/projects, with a sticky post at the beginning illustrating the device and indicating clearly the author, as well as all the available online resources.
Maybe the thread should be "closed" to normal users, i.e. no further posts should be added except the first one. Only admins/moderators should be able to post further info along time.

In any case the emphasis should be focused on supporting this peoples, either via donations or buying their products (when available).