What to buy? + op amps?

So I am thinking of buying a few parts for some future arduino projects and I noticed dipmicro has a good selection of parts I guess and it's cheap + shipping.

So I am wondering what are some parts or ICs people recommend I should get from dipmicro if you can look around there?

Also what are opamps used for? Does anyone know of any GOOD tutorials on how they are implemented and how they work? Ive looked around on the internet and alot of them don't explain it very well.

I'd previously ordered a collection of caps, LEDs, parts to make standalone arduino circuits - 16MHz crystals, 22 pf caps. Have built the first board already from those. 0.1uF (100nF) caps for noise decoupling. Maybe an enclosure or two, connectors to go to outside world, those get kind of project specific. Here's the last set of stuff I ordered. Some parts I have a specific use in mind, like the 220uF cap for driving AC into a speaker with from a MOSFET amp, 10 pin connector for a JTAG connector, RS232 driver to go with an SPI-driven UART to add 2nd hardware serial port, screw terminlal blocks to connect wires to.

Other parts seemed like something interesting to play with based on things I've seen here - RTC for instance, high current darlington output driver (ULN2803), optoisolators, shunt resistor for measuring current flow.

DIPs are easier to work with, but lately I've been picking up surface mount adapters as well, no special use in mind. Pin spacing on these vary, if you want an adapter board for specific part, make sure they match. I bought a couple of 28 pin adapters, later got 28 pin driver chips, pin spacings happened to match! Just got lucky there. Haven't mated the two yet.

Solder flux is good, isopropyl alchohol and a little brush for cleanup afterwards.

When I used op amps in the past, it was generally for audio purposes, and sometimes for voltage level comparisons to control something else. For audio, I was buffering inputs to get more gain or to have more current drive capability. Filtering to get allow certain frequency bands thru (low-pass, band-pass, high-pass), mixing signals together, buffering the outputs of D/A converters. For things like that, read the specs on the op amps and find some that are really low noise, measured in nV/Hz. http://www.dipmicro.com/store/LF356N These look pretty good - 12nV/Hz. Read the datasheet on the parts, look at the typical applications, get the support parts they show. Low power is good also if you are intending to make battery operated things, like a headphone amplifier. I preferred having +/-12 or +/-15 supplies for the ADCs and DACs to avoid DC offset on the AC signals (avoid any distortion added by DC blocking capacitors) and to not have to mess with adding offset to keep signals in the middle of single supply op amps, just one less thing to worry about. Bit of a purist thing I guess, but I had the parts to do that. This site covers them pretty well. http://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/opamp/opamp_1.html

Some perfboard to build circuits on is handy once you get past the breadboard stage. Strips of socket pins are very nice to make all your connections to, and then plug in your components. I prefer wirewrap for digital work, not into stripping & soldering lots of little wires, but then my eyes aren't as young as yours.

If you can afford it, a 'scope will come in really handy for op amp circuits. I had this behemoth Tektronix single channel scope that only had 60kHz bandwidth (looking at signals higher than that just dropped right off in amplitude). Later I got a better one. Now, I use this one www.dpscope.com. Bought it as a kit & assembled, just uses the computer screen for a display. Way handier. $70 plus shipping. The other thing I have used for looking at audio, picked up via microphone but no reason you couldn't make an adapter to go direct into your sound card, is Visual Analyzer. Free download from http://www.sillanumsoft.org/

Standalone 'arduino' in lower left, LED driver & current limit resistors on upper right, MOSFET amplifier in lower right, 7406 open collector with pullups used as line driver in upper left.

backside showing wirewrap & installation prior to connecting to other parts

Order Inventory: Product: 2pin 0.2” / 5mm screw terminal Quantity: 10 Product Code: DG126 Price: C$1.62

Product: 4N35-000E Quantity: 10 Product Code: 4N35 Price: C$2.54

Product: LQFP48/TQFP48 Module w/ 228 Proto Pads Quantity: 2 Product Code: PCB-LQFP48-DIP48G Price: C$3.00

Product: 10 Pin Shrouded Male Header Quantity: 1 Product Code: IDCM10 Price: C$0.27

Product: DS1307 Dallas Maxim 64 x 8 Serial Real-Time Clock Quantity: 2 Product Code: DS1307N Price: C$1.80

Product: RS232 Transceiver MAX232 Quantity: 5 Product Code: MAX232 Price: C$2.12

Product: Digital Echo / Surround Processor IC Quantity: 2 Product Code: PT2399 Price: C$1.66

Product: Darlington Driver 50V / 500mA ULN2803A ULN2803 Quantity: 2 Product Code: ULN2803A Price: C$1.31

Product: 10uF/25V Radial Electrolytic Capacitor Quantity: 20 Product Code: C7E10-25-105 Price: C$0.98

Product: 220uF/16V Radial Electrolytic Capacitor Quantity: 10 Product Code: C8E22-16.A Price: C$1.04

Product: Shunt Resistor 10m? 1W ±1% 20ppm Quantity: 1 Product Code: PWR4412-2SBR010F Price: C$1.58

Product: Optocoupler TLP521-1 Quantity: 10 Product Code: TLP521 Price: C$6.39

Great info @crossroads, and Nice construction! Ah, the good old wirewrap days… Once built an entire computer including floppy disk controller, all wirewrap.

Those plastic boxes are good for enclosures; small ones with 4-side snap gasket top are very water-resistant; just built an Arduino-based Camera Controller in one… Like this: http://yourduino.com/camera-control.htm

If we ArduinoNauts can come up with a good Electronics-Starter-Kit list I can arrange to source some at a good price with my friend who is 2 blocks from “Radio Row” in Shenzhen, China.

Anyone want to collaborate on that??

Regards, Terry King …On the Red Sea at KAUST.edu.sa
terry@terryking.us

Thanks Terry :)

[quote author=Terry King link=topic=55170.msg395360#msg395360 date=1300017249] Great info @crossroads, and Nice construction! Ah, the good old wirewrap days... Once built an entire computer including floppy disk controller, all wirewrap.

Those plastic boxes are good for enclosures; small ones with 4-side snap gasket top are very water-resistant; just built an Arduino-based Camera Controller in one.. Like this: http://yourduino.com/camera-control.htm

If we ArduinoNauts can come up with a good Electronics-Starter-Kit list I can arrange to source some at a good price with my friend who is 2 blocks from "Radio Row" in Shenzhen, China.

Anyone want to collaborate on that??

Regards, Terry King ..On the Red Sea at KAUST.edu.sa terry@terryking.us

[/quote]

that's a great idea. Sort of like a starter kit but BETTER! I'd love to collaborate on that if you have any ideas and such!

Sure - some shift-in & shift-out registers (or one that can be connected to do both, like 74AC299, and with good current support), single LED, tri-color LEDs, matrix LED, high current driver that can support row or column multiplexing of same, discrete transistors for relay drives for higher wattage projects, current limit resistors, an LCD screen, decoupling caps, larger DC blocking caps passing AC thru (like 220uF), efficient switching voltage regulator, some push buttons. 830 point solderless breadboard. Small piece of perfboard to move a project on to. ATMega328 in DIP package, 16MHz crystal, 22pF caps to install on the perfboard for the standalone project. Socket strip to plug the atmega onto so it can be removed for re-programming. Header strips for connecting wires to go off board (power or buttons or whatever. MOSFETs and speaker for noise. Maybe an dual op amp. ESD box to keep it all in.

What am I up to so far?

CrossRoads: Sure - some shift-in & shift-out registers (or one that can be connected to do both, like 74AC299, and with good current support), single LED, tri-color LEDs, matrix LED, high current driver that can support row or column multiplexing of same, discrete transistors for relay drives for higher wattage projects, current limit resistors, an LCD screen, decoupling caps, larger DC blocking caps passing AC thru (like 220uF), efficient switching voltage regulator, some push buttons. 830 point solderless breadboard. Small piece of perfboard to move a project on to. ATMega328 in DIP package, 16MHz crystal, 22pF caps to install on the perfboard for the standalone project. Socket strip to plug the atmega onto so it can be removed for re-programming. Header strips for connecting wires to go off board (power or buttons or whatever. MOSFETs and speaker for noise. Maybe an dual op amp. ESD box to keep it all in.

What am I up to so far?

WOW! Great line up! so just an off topic question here crossroads, where ca i learn about drivers and such and also do ou know any other websites that are great for learning electronics? (about op amps and drivers and ICs and their functions?)

Well, I did my learning in college from textbooks, then more from on the job designs and home projects and data sheets and application notes.

Not really possible to sum up by naming a few websites.

But try this one for op amps. http://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/opamp/opamp_1.html

For digital, there's just too many chips out there. My designs were always about speed, moving lots of data into & out of memory quickly - wasting nanoseconds was a concern. These days there are lots of specialized chips for doing stuff. One of my earliest projects with digital hardware was a clock with a ring of 60 LEDs for minutes and another ring of 12 for the hours. I learned about creating a power supply, about getting a 60 Hz signal from the power lines (and about it being unstable - which Bose apparently did not learn for my CD Clock Radio as it constantly gains time), about dividing down 60 Hz to get down to 1 PPS and about making counters that reset at 13 and 60, about debouncing switches for setting the time. Clock sounds pretty simple, right? And yet look at all the parts when you do it with hardware vs software. I don't recall my first op amp project. One I did in college was a drum sound creation project. I created different tones, used op amps to create envelopes to control the sound using transconductance amplifiers and voltage controlled amplifiers, picked up a trigger to start it to make a pulse a drum stick hitting something, playing with the delay and stuff. Going from there to A/Ds and storing stuff in memory and reading it back thru D/As, etc. One of my biggest projects involved sampling input with 12 bit A/D, storing in memory, reading back with user controlled delay from 4 different points at the same time, feeding that back into the input at different levels for different effects. Delay time was displayed on 4 digits. Controlling the timing of all that was a design challenge. Nowadays (and even then, but out of my price range at the time) software modeling of all kinds of theaters and tone control, etc. makes all that discrete hardware obsolete - but I learned a lot and still enjoy building hardware.

CrossRoads: Well, I did my learning in college from textbooks, then more from on the job designs and home projects and data sheets and application notes.

Not really possible to sum up by naming a few websites.

But try this one for op amps. http://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/opamp/opamp_1.html

For digital, there's just too many chips out there. My designs were always about speed, moving lots of data into & out of memory quickly - wasting nanoseconds was a concern. These days there are lots of specialized chips for doing stuff. One of my earliest projects with digital hardware was a clock with a ring of 60 LEDs for minutes and another ring of 12 for the hours. I learned about creating a power supply, about getting a 60 Hz signal from the power lines (and about it being unstable - which Bose apparently did not learn for my CD Clock Radio as it constantly gains time), about dividing down 60 Hz to get down to 1 PPS and about making counters that reset at 13 and 60, about debouncing switches for setting the time. Clock sounds pretty simple, right? And yet look at all the parts when you do it with hardware vs software. I don't recall my first op amp project. One I did in college was a drum sound creation project. I created different tones, used op amps to create envelopes to control the sound using transconductance amplifiers and voltage controlled amplifiers, picked up a trigger to start it to make a pulse a drum stick hitting something, playing with the delay and stuff. Going from there to A/Ds and storing stuff in memory and reading it back thru D/As, etc. One of my biggest projects involved sampling input with 12 bit A/D, storing in memory, reading back with user controlled delay from 4 different points at the same time, feeding that back into the input at different levels for different effects. Delay time was displayed on 4 digits. Controlling the timing of all that was a design challenge. Nowadays (and even then, but out of my price range at the time) software modeling of all kinds of theaters and tone control, etc. makes all that discrete hardware obsolete - but I learned a lot and still enjoy building hardware.

wow that's alot to learn! so are you an electronics engineer?

Yes, BSEE from RPI in 1985.

This is great, guys... the connection between WHAT (components) and HOW (learning) is what it's all about.

Too much concentration on Theory and HOW without hands-on the WHAT turns a lot of people off who probably could be happy and productive in a technical field.

Someone hacking stuff together without understanding basic electronics reality will become quickly frustrated unless they have access to information they can digest.

My slogan of the year is " LEARN! DO! "

My fantasy is that I/we/somebody puts together a "Starter Set" of electronics components that is linked to online information about WHAT the components are and HOW to utilize them.

I hope this can be a good collaboration, like much of the worthwhile Open-Source projects today. Who's In ??

What I can offer: - Web space and HTML tools to create decent online information - Access to "Radio Row 2011" which is the incredible SEG Market with almost 1000 shops selling electronics components of every description at low cost. - A way to package component sets and ship them worldwide at reasonable cost.

Disclaimer, I AM about to start an online Arduino-related shop and Educational website. But I would aim to keep this one 'product' at zero-5% max profit (more a question of figuring actual cost to acquire,pack,ship stuff).. This should not be very expensive, even if shipped in a decent plastic storage box.

@Crossroads, you have a great start to a list there. How can we organize and evolve this? On-Forum here is probably not good enough. How about a Wiki??

I started out building stuff with a single 3A4 project which I have kept to this day as a monument to Bad Soldering :) The digital clocks for Broadcast Stations came, um, (1967 - 1951 = 16 years later).

OK, what's next??

This one at dipmicro.com had a bunch of stuff that looked good. http://www.dipmicro.com/store/SET-START2

I kinda struggle with what to recommend - what kind of things do most beginners do, and do they actually get past making a few LEDs blink and into making a finished project? Some do, I think many don't. Don't have the tools maybe, or the know how to gather all the little pieces that let one actually turn out a nicely packaged design with usable I/O & power connections. I've got a whole pile of logic ICs, am not using any except an open collector inverter and an octal latch as a shift register because it had good drive capability. I've been buying stuff for a specific design - most of what I've needed is the parts that are enclosure related - connectors, screws/bolts, standoffs, the enclosures, perf board to build on, socket strips for mounting parts on & wirewrapping, current limit resistors, seem to have gone thru a lot of those. Bought a mixed bag of 7-segment displays, buzzed those out to find common anode parts that are easy to work with. Bought a bunch of 74AC299 universal shift registers for next round of projects. Went thru a pile of NPN transistors for LED drivers, a ULN2003 per card would have covered those too, but not nearly as interesting (for me). One of the vexing things to solve was interconnections between cards and the connectors on the chassis wall. I ended up using the pololu.com crimp terminated wires & crimp connector housings, sliding female pins over male wirewrap posts from marcospecialtes because I couldn't easliy purchase long-tail female headers to wirewrap onto. I also got shorter pin versions of these from gravitech.us, altho they are not listed parts. http://www.marcospecialties.com/product.asp?ic=SIP20L My project evolved from simple read of serial data to turn on 6 lights, then adding time display and scorekeeping, then replacing the external time creator & light generator data and adding remote control (and building the remote & programming that too) then condensing that down some into units without the time & score display, and lately replacing pro minis with standalone designs in those. And along the way continuallly improving my programming skills so things run faster. I need to revisit my 2nd design that has the time & score display, re-do some of the circuits as the shift registers that were added later that show some status things are still getting upset several times a night, and the things I've discovered helping others out can be applied to simplify things some there & the resulting parts reduction I think will help with the upsets also as I can reduce several interboard connections.

Interesting stuff! Yes, mechanical parts/enclosures , connectors, wire-cable are challenges… Then there’s tools… Eventually this becomes a Workshop discussion.

Let’s stick to what could be in a good basic starter set of what we might label “Electronics Components”… ???

I’ll try to look at this more tomorrow; today I’m still updating …Starter Sets (For Arduino, Electronic Bricks, etc)… Hope to have some things to show / critique Real Soon Now…

Hi Guys :) , I am what I would call a tinkerer with electronics and was always fascinated by the Arduino platform but the only ones I ever saw in the uk were a little over my price range. Then i saw this http://www.oomlout.co.uk/breadboard-arduino-compatible-kit-bbac-p-211.html?zenid=bd887aeffed13b88d061c20010b1f32e

I have used the new ethernet shield with SD and shiftregisters,leds, LDR , temperature sensors, buttons etc etc

This site has enabled a frugal begginer like me to begin to discover the awesome world that is the Arduino.

I have since transfered the kit to perfboard and am in the proccess of ordering more parts to make a multi core system that uses i2c for my caravan :)

My point is that I held back from buying an Arduino initially as i didnt want to do the wrong thing and accidently blow up a lot of money lol

The kit above is basic addmitedly but enabled me to not wory about things so much if it all whent pop

I guess what im trying to say is that to entice beginners it needs to be cheap .

I am not a stranger to electronics although I have no formal qualification on it but have a varied background of basic electronics repair , this comes in handy as if an electronic item dies in my home it gets striped of parts.

Anyway I think this is an excellent idea and if I can help in anyway at all please let me know

Chris

[quote author=Terry King link=topic=55170.msg396174#msg396174 date=1300101098] Interesting stuff! Yes, mechanical parts/enclosures , connectors, wire-cable are challenges... Then there's tools... Eventually this becomes a Workshop discussion.

Let's stick to what could be in a good basic starter set of what we might label "Electronics Components".. ???

I'll try to look at this more tomorrow; today I'm still updating ..Starter Sets (For Arduino, Electronic Bricks, etc)... Hope to have some things to show / critique Real Soon Now..

[/quote]

Hey since this is MY post I guess I should jump on the bandwagon eh? :D I would love to provide video tutorials and help with making shields for the website for anyone who wants them! We can have a video section with the tutorials and such and also a great forum community like we have here! For my tutorials I was thinking of basing each tutorial on one of the kit parts and explaining how it works, building a circuit out of it, and then talking about other devices that use that specific part. After "tutorializing" all the starter kit parts I would show how to mix them together and how the circuits work like that, there would also be a programming section in the video to incorporate the arduino into the equation.

I've noticed there are not many arduino tutorial videos on how to make things and how they each work. There's MAKE and Instructables but they don't focus on the arduino and definitely don't reply to their users on the forums. At the beginning of launch I could post maybe a few videos per week depending on my schedule. Then it would turn into a weekly thing I guess.

About the shields; some designers here like CrossRoads and others (maybe me) could design shield kits too and get them to a pcb manufacturer and include all the parts so people can build them. I have already made a 2nd version of my line following robot shield and would gladly make more shields that perform various functions like a motor driver.

Your right about the profit, the profit should be minimal because we are doing this for the love of electronics not the money ( well maybe the web hosting costs). That is why we can be so cheap because we won't earn much profit (when I say we I'm speaking as in you I guess, unless you let me join the team).

If we are all motivated we should start this right away! Not to rush but I am excited if this goes as planned!

Sounds like an interesting plan. Have you seen all the shields at http://www.shieldlist.org ?

CrossRoads: Sounds like an interesting plan. Have you seen all the shields at http://www.shieldlist.org ?

okay after looking at the shield list I realized that with a ,basically company, I won't be able to build such good shields. I would love to do tutorials on video and such but don't leave the shield creation to me!

polishdude20: Hey since this is MY post I guess I should jump on the bandwagon eh? :D I would love to provide video tutorials and help with making shields for the website for anyone who wants them! ... I've noticed there are not many arduino tutorial videos on how to make things and how they each work. ... If we are all motivated we should start this right away! Not to rush but I am excited if this goes as planned!

@polishdude20, I agree that there is a lack of tutorials at the Component level and beginner level.

There are some very well-done things at higher levels; John Boxall in Australia has done some great work with http://tronixstuff.com He has You-Tube clips showing the results of some of his things, but not how-to.

Matt Richardson has done some cool videos like this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R8_dAgaBBdI

I have done a lot of photography / Photoshop / Web stuff but not much Video. Can you put things like that together?? I think videos are very inspiring but need to be closely meshed with good online information for the "Sit and Think" that needs to follow.

I think we have hit on a missing link here: the basic electronics / component knowledge that is missing in most Arduino tutorials etc. You asked exactly the right QUESTION and often that is what's needed to promote progress.

I agree with the Arduino perspective of making physical computing accessible, but there could be a organized way to both drill down from that, and start up from components. Hmmm.

@crossroads, you have a lot of electronics background and experience, and are often helping people here understand stuff. What is your opinion?? Not everyone gets to go to RPI :)

I have been concentrating on the Arduino Newbie with http://yourduino.com. Please give me some feedback on that. BTW I just took the lock off the shop and my friend Peng and I are about ready to ship some stuff people have been asking for.

I don't want to hijack this, and I don't want this to be a commercial for my shop.. That's somewhat of a coincidence.

I would be happy to have this "Parts Is Parts" direction connect in through my site. I can provide lots of space, no problem, and Web tools if anyone needs them. Or we can start another site; I would help sponsor that.. And good photography of parts. We have a light tent / camera setup next to the SEG Market in China.

What is needed is people with interest and enthusiasm and enough personal bandwidth to put good material together.

I do have the ability to put together low-cost kits of parts. I do not want to try to be DipMicro with their very extensive stock of many hundreds of parts. I think they are a good solution for people building specific projects.

So. Please, everyone share your opinions of where to go...

I think there tons of tutorials out there, I think folks don't know about them. I never looked. Here's a nice one on motors for example. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5bHPKU4ybHY&feature=related

I don't want to just do another of these. I do like this one (found at random after watching the photog video above) because they go thru the schematic and the code. Or become a clearinghouse for good videos, altho I would say there is an appetite for these.

Hey Terry I can do photoshop,video editing, and all that sorts of stuff. Ive done it before and used to make TONS of videos on youtube until someone deleted all of them. I would be happy to write out tutorials as well as record them!

Can you "dumb down" the situation for me? Explain what is happening here in an easier way? About the parts and shipping and whatnot/