What was your first programming language?

As an aside to the first computer thread...

For me it was Atari BASIC. 8bit 12k of RAM. Tape drive storage. I was very young and got a good dose early on of how program logic relates to program structure. All you had was line numbers and GOTO and GOSUB. Everything was restricted to small sizes and there was this mysterious section of RAM that you accessed with PEEK and POKE commands that would do neat things with the graphics. It wasn't documented but I figured out how to change the background color and access the big silver buttons on the side and I read from somewhere how to copy an image into memory and paste it back on the screen in a different place. It used a lot of primitive if-goto for loops.

The neat thing about it was that the interpreter ran while you typed. It didn't have enough memory to hold a whole program in text so it ran the interpreter every time you hit enter and condense the line down into a single instruction or two and store just that. The cool thing about that was that it flagged syntax errors as you typed so when you hit run you knew for sure you wouldn't have any false starts.

A weird calculator language consisting of mathematical and other symbols. Not readable by any sense of the imagination. I soon 'graduated to Basic, first on a mainframe terminal, then on the (aforementioned) Compucolor II computer. Within a couple months, I learned Forth instead.

IBM 360 assembler on punch cards

...R

  • Casio Basic
  • Pascal
  • C/89
  • ADA

in this order

Logo controlling a triangle "turtle" on the screen, but for a very limited time on the only computer the class had.

I spent much more time playing with BASIC later when I had more access to computers.

CESIL

HP Basic

Python

ChrisTenone:
A weird calculator language consisting of mathematical and other symbols.

Sounds like APL

AWOL:
Sounds like APL

And in retrospect, it looked a bit like apl. It was 1968, so it may have come from the same roots.

Hi,

ChrisTenone:
A weird calculator language consisting of mathematical and other symbols. Not readable by any sense of the imagination.

They wouldn’t be like 1+1 = 2, 1+2 =3, 1+3 =4 ?
And they drew everything on a magic board what was black and they used coloured writing sticks?
And you had nap time in the afternoon?
Tom… :slight_smile: :sleeping:

I still nap in the afternoon. And no ...

The sticks were white.

Assembly language for 1802, 6502, z80, Atria basic, Commodore basic, Visual basic, ladder logic, and now maybe C/C++ maybe.

For the first time in my life, I'm having problems trying to learn a programming language and I don't know why.

Naneen:
For the first time in my life, I'm having problems trying to learn a programming language and I don't know why.

Because all the others are easier ?

...R

Naneen:
Assembly language for 1802, 6502, z80, Atria basic, Commodore basic, Visual basic, ladder logic, and now maybe C/C++ maybe.

For the first time in my life, I'm having problems trying to learn a programming language and I don't know why.

For years C (and all its variants) seemed incomprehensible and difficult to learn to me. Arduino changed all that - I still don't 'get' the value of stdio and all that stuff (seems to make the simple more complex), but the flow of the language makes perfect sense in a hardware oriented environment. I'm now a believer!

Fortran on punch cards

Boardburner2:
Fortran on punch cards

That came later - modelling the life-time economics of a gas field.

Later on spreadsheets made that sort of thing much easier.

...R

BASIC for me.

For the first time in my life, I’m having problems trying to learn a programming language and I don’t know why.

While the Arduino environment is based on C/C++, the Arduino Community is very much about “doing things” without really learning the language. If you have prior programming experience, and want to learn C, you might be better off looking for traditional tutorials and books, rather than Arduino stuff. And if you have a lot of experience with assemblers, it probably is better to learn C before trying C++; C is almost a “high level assembler” (although, for the PDP11 :slight_smile: ), but I suspect modern C++ teaching will throw you into a higher-level view of things (that will be LESS portable to an embedded environment.)

Boardburner2:
Fortran on punch cards

Oh geez! I must've blanked that one out. In the early 70s as a chemistry student, I had to use Fortran (I think punch cards was the only way to do it!) to calculate electron density in a molecule. I learned enough to get the assignment done, then put away my enthusiasm for computers until they got small enough to own one.

I never considered that I had 'learned' the language, rather I learned how to mimic the patterns others used.

Oh ... wait.

TRS-80 basic.