What would be the best setup to investigate energy loss using Arduino uno

I would like to investigate how fracture affects energy loss in different materials(metal, human bones etc) by transmitting the ultrasound signal through the material and analysis the received signal on the other end.

What would best setup and what transducers would be good for such an application, for frequency ranging from 25Khz to 3Mhz.

AdamMC:
I would like to investigate how fracture affects energy loss in different materials(metal, human bones etc)

On the face of it, that does not make any sense. Explain the physics of what you mean by this (and how you want to use an Arduino to help), and you might get an answer here. Also, has anyone ever done what you are proposing? How did they do it, and what did they find? What do you want to do differently? What do you expect to find?

Stop cross-posting.

DaveEvans:
On the face of it, that does not make any sense. Explain the physics of what you mean by this (and how you want to use an Arduino to help), and you might get an answer here. Also, has anyone ever done what you are proposing? How did they do it, and what did they find? What do you want to do differently? What do you expect to find?

The assumption is that wave energy loss will be higher in materials with defects( such as fractures) compared to those without. By comparing the energy transmitted by a defective and non defective material, information such as the defect size can be obtained, the Arduino is to be used to amplify, digitized and correlation analysis. Preliminary study was done- Sonic diagnosis of skeletal defects.

Good plan! Obviously, you will need suitable transducers and interface electronics.

Ultrasonic sensors are commonly used for non-destructive examination of metals and welds in the structural and mechanical engineering world (looking for defects). There is a vast, rich literature available on the subject.

Something similar called "pulse echo" testing is done to look for defects in cast-in-drilled-hole (CIDH) or drilled shaft concrete piles...tap on the top and look at the return signal.

I googled "sonic diagnosis of skeletal defects" and found an interesting paper about 40 years old on the use of ultrasonic sensors for examining bones (through soft tissue!); it mentioned which sensor they used, and it had an extensive bibliography. So no doubt there is a ton of information available about that application, too.

Suggest you hone your google skills.