What's your favourite Arduino model, past or present?

Just curious. I'm kind of partial to the Duemilanove, myself. Simple, classic design. I appreciate the Uno had some technical improvements, but at the cost of losing some of that pleasing simplicity.

Just wonder how others feel the more recent designs stack up (so to speak)?

I'm partial to 1284P and Bobuino's. (thanks to RetroLefty for the name). Have found the 2 hardware serial ports, extra IO without needing to add shift registers & such, and large SRAM to be great for projects. Prior to that, I favor Duemilanove also for simple fooling around projects to check out timing of software stuff. Also to add high current shift registers for clocks & displays.

I will always be a fan of 32 bit flat memory models. Self modifying code is just not practical with a Harvard model. Unfortunately, I have not had time to play with my Due so I don't how it stacks up against my other boards.

Teensy 2.0 is my favourite.

I appreciate the Uno had some technical improvements, but at the cost of losing some of that pleasing simplicity.

How so?

For just throwing something quickly on a breadboard to test out some new module or circuit I'm awful fond of the $7 E-bay asian clone Nano boards. Has FTDI on module, mini usb connector, plugs directly into solderless breadboard, provides enough reserve +5vdc current for simple modules/circuits.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Mini-USB-Nano-V3-0-ATmega328-5V-Micro-controller-Board-for-Arduino-compatible-SR-/291099876873?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item43c6e79e09

For showing off I do like my CrossRoads 1284P Bobuino board. ;)

[quote author=Coding Badly link=topic=241213.msg1730463#msg1730463 date=1400553124]

I will always be a fan of 32 bit flat memory models. Self modifying code is just not practical with a Harvard model. Unfortunately, I have not had time to play with my Due so I don't how it stacks up against my other boards.

Teensy 2.0 is my favourite.

I appreciate the Uno had some technical improvements, but at the cost of losing some of that pleasing simplicity.

How so?

[/quote]

Self modifiying code? Oh yea I remember that, uses lots of GOTOs. ;)

[quote author=Coding Badly link=topic=241213.msg1730463#msg1730463 date=1400553124]

I appreciate the Uno had some technical improvements, but at the cost of losing some of that pleasing simplicity.

How so?

[/quote]

Quite right, I had a look at the schematics, and many of the changes (e.g., using FETs and op-amps to auto switch the Vin source) I thought came in with the Uno actually came in with the Duemilanove. The Diecemila design is actually much closer to what I was thinking of interms of "pleasing simplicity".

I'm also surprised that in this thread everyone (except lefty) has nominated a derivative rather than an actual Arduino design as their favorite (which is what I was thinking of when I asked the question.) Personally, my favorite would be the Teensy 3.1 (which I think is approaching a work of art) if I was thinking of including derivatives as well.

But what I was wondering, I suppose, is how people see the general direction of Arduino board designs as they've developed over the last few years -- Leo, Due, Esplora, Yun, Tre, now Zero. Obviously we are getting a long way from the "The boards can be built by hand or purchased preassembled" claim that still greets you on the arduino.cc home page. Massimo said in an interview about the Zero that he imagined the user "would not even realise they were using a microcontroller", which gave me pause. Is that really something to aspire to?

When you work with a Diecemila or similar simple design, it strikes me that you can be in doubt that what you are dealing with is in fact microcontroller. And personally, I have no problem with that at all -- I think it's great, in fact! But my suspicion is that I may be on a complete different page there to Massimo and where Arduino may be heading.

When you work with a Diecemila or similar simple design, it strikes me that you can be in little doubt that what you are dealing with is in fact microcontroller. And personally, I have no problem with that at all -- I think it's great, in fact! But my suspicion is that I may be on a complete different page there to Massimo and where Arduino may be heading.

Yes, the official Arduino product line is going in way too many directions for my tastes, but if they think there is a market and a need then who am I to poo poo their marketing strategy?

As long as they don't forget their roots and still continue to support the older original designs in the current IDE release then there is really little to fear for the users.

Lefty

pico: Massimo said in an interview about the Zero that he imagined the user "would not even realise they were using a microcontroller"...

As opposed to what?

retrolefty: For just throwing something quickly on a breadboard to test out some new module or circuit I'm awful fond of the $7 E-bay asian clone Nano boards. Has FTDI on module, mini usb connector, plugs directly into solderless breadboard, provides enough reserve +5vdc current for simple modules/circuits.

+1, especially for the form factor and ftdi. Even if I work on Linux : there is dramatically less "avrdude not in sync" with FTDI that with 8U2 or 16U2

For final work I prefer mini-pro and ISP programing.

[quote author=Jack Christensen link=topic=241213.msg1731390#msg1731390 date=1400607694]

pico: Massimo said in an interview about the Zero that he imagined the user "would not even realise they were using a microcontroller"...

[/quote] Massimo would do well to deliver the TRE announced since the beginning October 2013, there are seven months. Or at least give news, TRE is always in status "Coming soon" on the arduino web site. This gives me the impression that nothing was started the day of announcement . Announcement was made only to prevent disappointed user of DUE to go on the MBED project.

But what I was wondering, I suppose, is how people see the general direction of Arduino board designs as they've developed over the last few years -- Leo, Due, Esplora, Yun, Tre, now Zero.

In my opinion, those are all much more software intensive boards than the original 168/328 and even 1284/2560 boards. Those 8-bit boards provide a nice mix of hardware controllability, either directly or with adequate signal buffering (directly, or via some shift registers and I2C or SPI or Serial controlled devices). Tha later one seem to me to be much more software oriented. I am not interested in writing that much code and learning the great number of libraries involved to really take advantage of them.

I think the Uno nailed it. Dead simple and ready to go out of the box, no fiddling with jumpers or whatever.

I'm not inclined to bother with the Due personally, but I think it's a good product to have in the lineup. All the weird form factors (the joystick for e.g.) and non-Atmel stuff is a dead-end IMO (but what do I know?)

retrolefty: Yes, the official Arduino product line is going in way too many directions for my tastes, but if they think there is a market and a need then who am I to poo poo their marketing strategy?

Arduino team earns money with his work and this is normal. To continue to earn money they must always provide innovative cards. Otherwise the Chinese clones will kill the market.

Pro Mini - mostly cheap clones and generally for that reason.

On "breadboard" - somewhat more versatile than the UNO which is really only for fitting shields.

Or a Pro Micro (haven't got them working yet - trouble with the libraries or something) or Nano.

68tjs: [quote author=Jack Christensen link=topic=241213.msg1731390#msg1731390 date=1400607694]

pico: Massimo said in an interview about the Zero that he imagined the user "would not even realise they were using a microcontroller"...

Massimo would do well to deliver the TRE announced since the beginning October 2013, there are seven months. Or at least give news, TRE is always in status "Coming soon" on the arduino web site. This gives me the impression that nothing was started the day of announcement . Announcement was made only to prevent disappointed user of DUE to go on the MBED project. [/quote]

You can could buy a dev version of the TRE for 149 euro. Unfortunately, I just had another look and they are now out of stock.

I don't like the power-switching circuit, so my favorite (official board) is back around diecemila as well. Maybe the Freeduino TH ( :-) ) Derivative-wise: I haven't really stressed the resources of a 328, so the bigger processors haven't attracted me so much. I DO prefer the DIP-based designs; a board I can't build myself gives me a certain queasy feeling.