Where can I buy wide breadboards?

I have one of these:

But I want to have something like this (I just draw that):

Where can I buy this?

I have never seen double-wide breadboards before.

Those little tabs on the sides interlock so you can link breadboards together. If you don't want the power bus between each board you can cut the adhesive backing and remove them, they are also connected using tabs.

You can remove the power/ground rail on one side and stick two of such boards together.

What project is requiring that double wide breadboard?

I just got a NodeMCU 1st gen that needs two side by side breadboards since the thing is so wide.

If you need more connections for a row just jumper to a free row.

.

But I want to have something like this

No you don't. Bread board is an abomination. If your circuit needs that much space it is time to take your stabilizers off and learn how to solder.

Interesting point of view but I don't have the same bad experience. All of my developments start life on a solderless breadboard and despite buying cheap ones, I have had no real trouble.

I'm not developing mains voltage, multi kW applications, however, just low power, low voltage applications.

Clearly, soldering makes better connections for the next stage of prototyping, but it takes longer and the components are less re-usable.

What I have noticed, and this could be something to do with OP's question is that some breakout boards, especially those for an already large module ( eg ESP8266 etc.) consume so much of the breadboard space that there is hardly any space left to make connections to it.

Grumpy_Mike:
No you don't. Bread board is an abomination. If your circuit needs that much space it is time to take your stabilizers off and learn how to solder.

Why do you think breadboard is bad?

6v6gt:
What I have noticed, and this could be something to do with OP's question is that some breakout boards, especially those for an already large module ( eg ESP8266 etc.) consume so much of the breadboard space that there is hardly any space left to make connections to it.

Go underneath it.

Smajdalf:
Why do you think breadboard is bad?

Because it teaches you only to waggle components if it does not work. It adds an extra dimension of things to go wrong. So many times people come here with problems that turn out to be faulty bread boards. I have seen people at exhibitions waggling components on a bread board once the public have been admitted. They don't travel well and they don't last once a circuit is on the board giving rise to the "it worked yesterday " syndrome.

There are three main problems with a breadboard:

  • people plug items into them that are too large leaving the springs damaged and intermittent.
  • the holes near the 'trough' should only be used for I.C. pins
  • people don't replace the damn things when they get iffy.

.

Before
double wide breadboard-A.jpg
After
double wide breadboard-B.jpg

that’s as close as you are going to get to a double wide breadboard

Because it teaches you only to waggle components if it does not work. It adds an extra dimension of things to go wrong. So many times people come here with problems that turn out to be faulty bread boards. I have seen people at exhibitions waggling components on a bread board once the public have been admitted. They don’t travel well and they don’t last once a circuit is on the board giving rise to the "it worked yesterday " syndrome.

This is definitely true but really only means that they shouldn’t be used for trade shows or exhibitions.

There are three main problems with a breadboard:

  • people plug items into them that are too large leaving the springs damaged and intermittent.

  • the holes near the ‚Äėtrough‚Äô should only be used for I.C. pins

  • people don‚Äôt replace the damn things when they get iffy.

the holes near the ‚Äėtrough‚Äô should only be used for I.C. pins

The problem with that is that if a chip overheats it melts those trough pins, and you can’t use that location for a chip anymore.

people don’t replace the damn things when they get iffy.

Also true. I am a chronic offender. I can’t bring myself to through away a breadboard. I stand next to the trash can holding the breadboard right above it and my fingers won’t open. This goes on for so long eventually I have to go eat or go to the bathroom…or go to bed. I put it away for the next attempt. Never happens…

Grumpy_Mike:
Because it teaches you only to waggle components if it does not work. It adds an extra dimension of things to go wrong. So many times people come here with problems that turn out to be faulty bread boards. I have seen people at exhibitions waggling components on a bread board once the public have been admitted. They don't travel well and they don't last once a circuit is on the board giving rise to the "it worked yesterday " syndrome.

Don't blame a perfectly good tool for people's stupidity. Anyone stupid enough to use a solderless breadboard when they need things to work deserves whatever they get.

Jiggy-Ninja:
Don't blame a perfectly good tool for people's stupidity.

But a tool that positively encourages stupidity has got to be a bad thing.

A bit like stabilisers on a bike. You can know when to take it off but if you never have them in the first place that transition is unnecessary. Many people, myself included, never had stabilisers when learning to ride.

I agree with many others that these plug-in breadboards are an abomination for all but
a quick test lash-up with few components. Their connections are unreliable, their stray capacitance and inductance is large and unknown ,they won’t take much current, and they take up masses of space.

That said, I‚Äôve knocked up loads of little gadgets on ‚ÄėVeroboard‚Äô - but at least the connections were soldered.

regards

Allan

I have more than a dozen solderless breadboards with different circuits on them that I maintain at all times with no problems. Every time a post comes along with some variation of one of the circuits I test it and then either leave it like that or restore the original configuration. I have kept all the circuits because they continue to work. Originally, my plan was to keep them until they stopped working and then remove the components and clean the breadboard with a can of pressurized air but they continued to work. This includes five. standalone ATmega328s ( with 16 MHz crystals) , one L293 , one H-bridge stepper driver , one HV EL backlight power supply ( made with two ATtiny85s, ) and a bunch of other common circuits. I only use one circuit at any given time and sometimes build something involving up to ten chips and then leave it until I am sure I don’t need it any more and then remove all the components and blow out the dust with the air cans. This allows me to test many different posts with almost no effort because the circuits are already built. All I have to do is reconfigure them to match the OP’s circuit. I use a few cans of air per year. I have not had any circuits fail to work.after blowing out the dust. ( it’s in my garage).
For the record , I started building these circuits when I joined the forum almost exactly 3 years ago (Nov-4th, 2013). Since then I have removed many circuits to build others and then replaced the original circuits on some breadboards while leaving the others intact. There is no rhyme or reason for why I will disassemble any particular circuit, other than I want to try a different design or want to put something else there. Very , very , rarely is it because the circuit is intermittent or unreliable.
Old equipment, if properly maintained , can continue to serve it’s purpose for many years. I once had to through out a breadboard because the chip overheated and melted the plastic , but that is extremely rare. The small breadboard cost about $7 at Fry’s. The H-bridge driver is on a very large metal base breadboard that I bought in 1982.

Would I keep these circuits on the breadboards if they didn’t work ?

photo-1:
1: H-bridge stepper driver
2: standalone ATmega328
3: standalone ATmega328 with 4-bit LCD (connection wires removed temporarily)

photo-2 & 3:
1: L293 circuit
2: DS18B20 with 6 DS18B20s on the same onewire bus
3: ATmega328 with ‚ÄúKnightryder‚ÄĚ led display
4: standalone ATmega328
5: HUZZAH
6: Power Mosfet (there’s a 12V DC motor connected hanging by below the table from the wire leads)
7: Opto-Interrupter (stepper motor homing flag type)
8: A4988 stepper driver
9 UNO (Rugged Circuits)
10: UNO (genuine)
11: MAX-31855 Thermocouple Module (Adafruit) with 74HC4050 interface
12: 3.3V Pro-Mini with TXB108 Level Shifter module
13: 16-key Membrane Keypad circuit (see last photo)
14: 5V Pro-Mini (that drives the keypad matrix circuit)
15: 300V HV EL Backlight Power Supply

BREADBOARDED CIRCUITS-1.jpg

BREADBOARDED CIRCUITS-2.jpg

BREADBOARDED CIRCUITS-3.jpg

keypad matrix circuit.jpg

The red wire next to the white, is not quite fully inserted in the breadboard.

PCBs are much more reliable then breadboards!

.

Nice crystal ball ... I see it's fully operational! :sunglasses:

The red wire next to the white, is not quite fully inserted in the breadboard.

Thanks for the heads up on the wire. That explains why it was intermittent…

Nice crystal ball … I see it’s fully operational! :sunglasses:

That’s the 74C922 16-key membrane keypad encoder with the I2C LCD, the oldest circuit on the bench,
running this code:

const int intISR = 0; // Interrupt0 on pin 2
volatile boolean newKey = false;
volatile int Flagpin=8;
volatile int total=0;
volatile int Key=0;



            
                // 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12     13 14     15
int totVals [] = { 1, 2, 3, 10, 4, 5, 6, 11, 7, 8, 9, 12, 14, 0, 15,    13};


#include <Wire.h> 
#include <LCD.h>
#include <LiquidCrystal_I2C.h>

LiquidCrystal_I2C lcd(0x27, 2, 1, 0, 4, 5, 6, 7, 3, POSITIVE);
//REQUIRES LiquidCrystal Library
void setup()
{

   // Print a message to the LCD.
  lcd.backlight();
  lcd.print("Hello, world!");
  /* Initialise the LCD */
  lcd.begin(16, 2);
  
  
   attachInterrupt(intISR,readEncoder , CHANGE); 
   DDRD = B00000000; // set PORTD (digital 7~0)=INPUTS
   pinMode(Flagpin, OUTPUT);
   Serial.begin(9600);
  
  }
  
  void loop()
 {
      
       digitalWrite(Flagpin,LOW);
       delay(300);
       total=0; 
       newKey = false;  
        /* Output the test message to the LCD */
         switch(Key)
       
                {
                    Serial.print("START CASE "); 
                  case 0:
                     printmsg();
                  break;
                  case 1:
                     printmsg();
                  break; 
                  case 2:
                     printmsg();
                  break;

                  case 3:
                     printmsg();
                  break;  
                  case 4:
                    printmsg();
                  break; 
                  case 5:
                    printmsg();
                  break; 
                  case 6:
                     printmsg();
                  break;
                  case 7:
                     printmsg();
                  break;
                 case 8:
                    printmsg(); 
                  break;
                   case 9:
                    printmsg();
                  break;
                   case 10:
                   printmsg();
                  break;
                   case 11:
                    printmsg();
                  break;
                   case 12:
                    printmsg();
                  break;
                   case 13:
                    printmsg();
                  break;
                   case 14:
                    printmsg(); 
                  break;
                   case 15:
                   printmsg();
                  break;
                  
                 }
 
 }
  
 void readEncoder() 
{
 
      digitalWrite(Flagpin,HIGH);
      total = PIND >> 4; 
      Key = totVals[total];
      newKey = true;
      Serial.print("key=  ");
      Serial.println(Key);
     
      
       
}    
void printmsg()
  {
 
    lcd.setCursor(0,0); 
    lcd.print("CMD-");
    lcd.print(Key);
    lcd.print("           "); 
    lcd.setCursor(0,1); 
    lcd.print("Do "); 
    lcd.print("CMD-");
    lcd.print(Key);
    lcd.print("           "); 
  }

If I might interrupt the evils of breadboards discussion to get back to the original question there are breadboard strips or terminal strips, for example:

http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/3m/923292-I/923292-ND/3813

I'm sure we've all had issues with breadboards just like we've all had issues with cold or bridged solder joints. I've had to troubleshoot nicked insulation on wire-wrapped boards too. I'm sure cheap breadboards will have more problems than quality ones too but I don't think one can discount bread-boarding as a whole. If that were the case the breadboard would have gone out of style a while ago but they have stayed around for decades.