Where do uProcessors store data? Data organized? Programs to parse data?

Arduino projects will usually involve input (from the world) via sensors and output (via actuators). More broadly, any application requiring a uController will generate data and some processing will need to be done on that data.

The data must exist somewhere and must be processed. We can thus differentiate between the overhead process involved in storing that data and the processing done on that data. Because data exists, there must be storage medium. Because data is collected, there must be a scheme to determine how data gets organized.

I was wondering if there is a standard for storing data and a standard scheme to store such data. For instance, although unlikely, do all programs that need to store data store that data in .txt files?

Within those files, do people arbitrarily define a scheme to organize data. Do those same people write programs to parse data?

Often, RAM variables are used. So is EEPROM.

There's two main computer architectures used in real computers. There's the vonNeumann architecture and there's the Harvard architecture. Your PC is vonNeumann, an Arduino is Harvard.

Read those pages on Wikipedia and try asking the question again.

There are a lot of other theoretical or experimental architectures which aren't in common usage.

ElusivePi:
I was wondering if there is a standard for storing data and a standard scheme to store such data. For instance, although unlikely, do all programs that need to store data store that data in .txt files?

Within those files, do people arbitrarily define a scheme to organize data. Do those same people write programs to parse data?

I think you are confusing the difference between short term data storage - while the Arduino is working - and long term data storage - to preserve data when the Arduino is off.

While the Arduino is working the data it is collecting and calculating is stored in RAM memory in a scheme that is specific to the Arduino. While most microprocessors use similar schemes the scheme is of no great interest to the programmer because he cannot see it independently of the microprocessor. The Arduino Uno has 2k of RAM. There is no concept of files for data in RAM.

Data in RAM is lost when the Arduino is switched off.

If you want to preserve data when the Arduino is switched off you have, generally, two choices - store the data in the Arduino’s EEPROM memory or store it in some external memory. That could involve sending it to a PC or perhaps adding an SD Card to the Arduino.

Note that the Arduino has an entirely separate memory for the program code, and, obviously, that is not lost when the Arduino is switched off.

…R