Which is the best Arduino based tachometer?

Hello, there are lots of homemade Arduino based tachometers posted on the net. Which one is the best in terms of accuracy and able to keep count on high rpm? What are the disadvantageous of using this kind of tachometers vs. the commercial ones?

newto_arduino: Hello, there are lots of homemade Arduino based tachometers posted on the net.

So .., you would like me to trawl the internet to find several of them, evaluate each of them and the give you my suggestion?

Won't happen.

If you post a link to one of them and tell us what your project requires then we may be able to say if it is suitable, What do you mean by "accurate" and by "high RPM"?

...R

newto_arduino: Hello, there are lots of homemade Arduino based tachometers posted on the net. Which one is the best in terms of accuracy and able to keep count on high rpm? What are the disadvantageous of using this kind of tachometers vs. the commercial ones?

The obvious disadvantage is you can return a commercial one if it doesn't work.

Paul

Robin2: So .., you would like me to trawl the internet to find several of them, evaluate each of them and the give you my suggestion?

Won't happen.

If you post a link to one of them and tell us what your project requires then we may be able to say if it is suitable, What do you mean by "accurate" and by "high RPM"?

...R

Perhaps I should ask which sensor produces more accurate readings. As the motors spin so fast, I cannot count myself to verify if the readings are correct.

which sensor produces more accurate readings

That would depend on the sensor, and what the sensor is sensing, as well as the accuracy of whatever time base you use.

As you will hopefully understand at some point, the quality of the answers you get depends on the quality and quantity of information you provide.

This insight is covered in the recommended reading, the "How to use this forum" post.

newto_arduino: Perhaps I should ask which sensor produces more accurate readings. As the motors spin so fast, I cannot count myself to verify if the readings are correct.

I have a small DC motor with a circle of plastic attached to the motor shaft. The plastic is a 1mm slice from an 8mm knitting needle. The disc is painted black with a small blob of white paint. I have a QRE1113 reflective optical sensor which generates an interrupt in my Arduino when it sees the white paint. My program measures the time (in microseconds) between pulses and also counts the pulses. It seems to work perfectly well at speeds up to and beyond 12,000 RPM.

All this fits inside an OO Gauge model railway locomotive.

It is always a good idea to have some means to verify results. I have a cheap multimeter that can measure frequency as well a more recently acquired pocket sized oscilloscope.

...R