Which speaker should I use?

Using an Arduino Uno, a Wii Nunchuk, and a screen, I am trying to make a game system. However, I want music. What would be good speaker that can play at least 164 Hz to 784 Hz and can be easily used by an Arduino?

Unless you want to do this project as a learning experience or “because I can”, there are some existing Arduino-based game systems ( handheld or console-like) that you can use as a starting point. Once you get one you can program your own games and/or modify the hardware to your heart’s content. Just a though…

In any case, even if you use a basic ~8 ? what has a greater impact on your audio quality is how the audio signal is generated. I’d head over to the Audio section of the Forum for some ideas for either getting the most out of an Uno’s built-in capabilities or using specialized audio modules. For example, there’s an active thread about playing music by using Pulse Width Modulation.

Edit: Here’s a link to Gameduino a shield with extra video and sound hardware, including a stereo jack for speakers or headphones.

However, I want music

Directly from Arduino pins (chiptunes)?
Through an MP3/WAV player shield?
From a specialized sound chip (synthesizer)?

Arduino pins -> piezo speaker

is the type of wiring I want.
By the way, I'm only making my device with a Nunchuk because I read how to use a Nunchuk with Arduino in a book.

Basically I'm going to find out the frequencies of each note and play a group of those frequencies from an array, using the tone() function, to make the music.

coastersplus:
Basically I'm going to find out the frequencies of each note and play a group of those frequencies from an array, using the tone() function, to make the music.

Well that will limit you to rather retro-sounding 8-bit tunes, like the first generation Nintendo. The PWM thread I linked to earlier would give you better quality sound without any extra hardware.

Edit:To be clear the sound quality will still be largely determined by how it's generated, regardless of if you a piezo or a different type of speaker.

Far-seeker:
The PWM thread I linked to earlier would give you better quality sound without any extra hardware.

I’ll look into that.

at least 164 Hz to 784 Hz

160Hz is fairly low when compared to most consumer gadgets like phones and sucy. Of course, "can play" is quite a bit different than can play at flat frequency response. I'm just using my audio engineer ears, but my laptop sounds like it has a high pass filter on it at 1Khz.

A speaker that only goes up to 784Hz is going to be VERY VERY dull. Fair warning.

How did you arrive at those frequency specs? Just curious. :grin:

Well that will limit you to rather retro-sounding 8-bit tunes, like the first generation Nintendo.

Just for the record, if you played an 8-bit Nintendo through a speaker that topped off at 784Hz, it sound would sound like you put a pillow over the speaker.

Unfortunately, I can offer little more advice than clarification on what a X frequency sounds like.

How did you arrive at those frequency specs? Just curious.

I wondered about that myself. It's E3 to G5 (Middle C is C4), so just over two octaves, roughly in the middle of the piano range.

brandondrury:

Well that will limit you to rather retro-sounding 8-bit tunes, like the first generation Nintendo.

Just for the record, if you played an 8-bit Nintendo through a speaker that topped off at 784Hz, it sound would sound like you put a pillow over the speaker.

I never ment to imply that speaker frequency range never matter at all. My point was that if the process you use to generate the sound signal is rather poor to begin with, putting the best quality speakers ever made won't change the poor quality of the output. Speakers can pontentially limit audio quality by being incapable of properly outputting the entire frequency range of a signal, but by themselves they cannot really improve the audio quality of an existing signal.

I wondered about that myself. It's E3 to G5 (Middle C is C4), so just over two octaves, roughly in the middle of the piano range.

Keep in mind that when people refer to an A (I forget which one) being 440Hz, that is only the fundamental frequency. There are many harmonics that make a piano a piano that can and will go as high as 10k at least to a slight degree. Pure sine waves are the only audio signals I know that don't have harmonics in higher registers. For everything else you'll want higher frequency response than was mentioned here previously if sound quality matters at all. :smiley:

A (I forget which one) being 440Hz

A4.