Why does my 433 MHz sensor not capture every remote control?

Hello there,

I have recently bought a 433 MHz kit with a sender and a receiver. I want to control some wireless sockets and my screen. As you can see on the attached file, that both send on a frequency of 433,92MHz.

Now there is one problem:
When I run my code (also attached) the sensor only recognises one remote - the one on the left for the screen.

I'm using an ESP8266 NodeCMU (https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/B07FNQN54V/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1)
and this is the receiver (https://www.ebay.de/itm/252713874815).

Is there anything i forgot to do?

Thanks in advance.

myCode.PNG

You forgot the modulation method, encoding method, data speed, and probably others.

Paul

Is there anything i forgot to do?

Determine what sort of transmissions are sent by the remote(s). There is literally an infinite variety.

This is a good starting tutorial for how to do that.

flagga:
Hello there,

I have recently bought a 433 MHz kit with a sender and a receiver. I want to control some wireless sockets and my screen. As you can see on the attached file, that both send on a frequency of 433,92MHz.

Now there is one problem:
When I run my code (also attached) the sensor only recognises one remote - the one on the left for the screen.

Your receiver can only do OOK, not any of the many possible modulations methods used.

At the very least you'll need a good realtime RF spectrum analyzer (or software defined radio) to
reverse-engineer random ISM band gadgets. You got lucky with one of the remotes, the other
is likely using some sort of FSK, or maybe QAM or even spread-spectrum techniques.

Paul_KD7HB:
You forgot the modulation method, encoding method, data speed, and probably others.

Are those really necessary? I thought that they are set by default.

flagga:
Are those really necessary? I thought that they are set by default.

Everyone uses their mouth to speak but you don't understand all the languages that are spoken. Same thing. 433Mhz is the mouth, but what language is being spoken (modulation method, encoding method, data speed, etc.)

flagga:
Are those really necessary? I thought that they are set by default.

What default? the ISM band plans have limits on power duty-cycle and modulation,
varying territory by territory, but precise modulation is usually only loosely constrained,
such as "OOK + NBFM", which doesn't tie down baud rate, deviation, exact frequency...

And after modulation you need the preamble and CRC details...