Why does the Button example use a conditional instead of functions as arguments?

I'm working my way through the examples on my new Arduino Uno compatible board.

I've got to the Button example which uses the following lines of code:

int buttonState = 0;         // variable for reading the pushbutton status

...

// read the state of the pushbutton value:
  buttonState = digitalRead(buttonPin);

  // check if the pushbutton is pressed. If it is, the buttonState is HIGH:
  if (buttonState == HIGH) {
    // turn LED on:
    digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
  } else {
    // turn LED off:
    digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
  }

Where it seems the following single line does the same job:

digitalWrite(ledPin, digitalRead(buttonPin));

Apart from pedagogy (teaching how if.. else...works), are there any reasons for using the more verbose code rather than a more abbreviated form with the Arduino?

are there any reasons for using the more verbose code rather than a more abbreviated form with the Arduino?

The examples are meant to be easy to understand and splitting the reading and testing into multiple steps is easier to understand than the less verbose suggested code

Ok, thanks that’s clear!