Why hasn't Arduino become industrialized

I've been working with Arduino for almost a full year on small projects but I've witnessed it's potential and I'm just curious why doesn't any take it to the next level on massive industrial projects!

It's underpowered for "massive industrial projects!". Too slow, not enough memory. Look at it's goal - easy to use hardware for artists & hobbyists. Not massive industrial control. For that you need real engineering teams.

It's really a "dev board" series - like the MSP430 and its ilk.

You develop things using it (within its scope), you might use them as such for very small scale developments, for serious projects, you then design a complete PCB - which is no longer an Arduino as such. If you need USB and an update facility, you would retain the bootloader.

The industrial equivalent has existed for years. Usually "PLCs" (Programmable Logic Controller), programmed with "easy to understand" (and "backward compatible with old fashioned relays and such") "Ladder Logic."

Priorities are different for such devices. They're more "hardened" and ... quite expensive. (when you're controlling equipment worth tens of thousands of dollars, it's not important for the PLC to cost $30...)

westfw: They're more "hardened" and ... quite expensive.

They would want to be.

I am persistently frustrated by the short working lives of so much recent equipment - ADSL modems, power packs, cables, tablets and the worst - MP3 players and cheap earphones. :grinning: Computers are generally not so bad if you purchase the "business" version.

Running hot is in particular, not a good sign.

so what is the potential that you witness and what are the massive industrial projects you are referring to? So you have bought a very sharp little knife, and cut many things with it, and are very happy about it, and you want this little knife to do a lot in a massive industrial project? seriously, there are water cutting machines out there that use high water pressures. when people think of cutting something, they will never think about your little sharp knife.

You make a valid point, but I've seen the processing power of the Arduino and from what I've seen, wonder why it could never replace PLC's and save people money, and be more efficient. Am i wrong to think this?

TLuck: I've been working with Arduino for almost a full year on small projects but I've witnessed it's potential and I'm just curious why doesn't any take it to the next level on massive industrial projects!

From what I've seen so far I would trust the AVR processors used in the Arduino to things like dishwashers, toasters, washing machines, coffee machines and so on. They are already used in other devices for certain, such as RFID readers and 3D printers.

According to this Wikipedia page:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atmel_AVR

AVRs have been used in various automotive applications such as security, safety, powertrain and entertainment systems.

So I don't know you can say for sure that it isn't already in such projects.

How about Industruino?

Wow, now that's exactly what I was expecting to see. They really took that up a notch.

AVR chips are used in industrial automation. But usually Arduino boards and IDE are not, as Arduino boards are for development, not production and their pay-for programming tools are better. Have you ever been to the Atmel site?

i am using it :D for industrial use that's the simple product i have, the other one more complicated and more big, "automation board" i have a custom ultrasonic sensor too :grinning: waterproof

OR this one http://controllino.cc/

I bought a few scrap board off eBay because they have a Virtex XC6VLX240T FPGA on them. They are Motorola boards for some sort of back-end communications system and they are chock full of very expensive high end parts. One of the parts is an ATXMEGA192A3. If Motorola trusts Atmel’s parts, so do I. I am just not sure if the MEGA is as trustworthy as the XMEGA but I would think so.