Will it work...

I haven't got my Arduino Uno yet, but i already started writing some lines of my first code.
So I wanted to show you guys this and whould like to know what you think of it.

And maybe get the answer to one tiny question.

Q. Why do I get the following error message.

(Sketch1.ino: In function 'void loop()':
Sketch1:36: error: 'value' was not declared in this scope
Sketch1:42: error: 'value' was not declared in this scope
Sketch1:48: error: 'value' was not declared in this scope)

int analog0 = 0; // select the input pin for the potentiometer    (FWD)
int analog1 = 1; // select the input pin for the potentiometer    (Bck)
int analog2 = 2; // select the input pin for the potentiometer    (Brake)
int buttonPin1 = 3; // select the input pin for the switch        (FreeW)
int analogVal0 = 0; // variable to store the value coming from the sensor
int analogVal1 = 0; // variable to store the value coming from the sensor
int analogVal2 = 0; // variable to store the value coming from the sensor

const int buttonPin2 = 4;      // the number of 1st pushbutton pin
int ledPin1 =  12;      // the number of the LED pin (Left)
const int buttonPin3 = 5;      // the number of 2st pushbutton pin
int ledPin2 =  13;      // the number of the LED pin (Right)

int buttonState1 = 0;         // variable for reading the pushbutton 1 status
int buttonState2 = 0;         // variable for reading the pushbutton 2 status
int buttonState3 = 0;         // variable for reading the pushbutton 2 status


void setup()

{
  pinMode(6, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(9, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(2, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(4, OUTPUT);
  
  pinMode(ledPin1, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(ledPin2, OUTPUT);
}

void loop()

{
  {
    analogVal0 = analogRead(analog0); 
    value /= 4;
    digitalWrite (4, HIGH);
    digitalWrite (6, value);
  }
{  
    analogVal1 = analogRead(analog1);
    value /= 4;
    digitalWrite (2, HIGH);
    digitalWrite (9, value);
}
{  
    analogVal1 = analogRead(analog2);
    value /= 4;
    digitalWrite (9, value);
    digitalWrite (6, value);
}
{  
    analogVal1 = analogRead(buttonPin1);
    digitalWrite (2, HIGH);
    digitalWrite (4, HIGH);
}

buttonState2 = digitalRead(buttonPin2);

   if (buttonState2 == HIGH)
{     
   digitalWrite(ledPin1, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
   delay(500);               // wait for a half second
   digitalWrite(ledPin1, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
   delay(500);               // wait for a half second 
   } 
   else
{
     digitalWrite(ledPin1, LOW);	// turn LED off
}

buttonState3 = digitalRead(buttonPin3);

   if (buttonState2 == HIGH)
{     
   digitalWrite(ledPin2, HIGH);   // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
   delay(500);               // wait for a half second
   digitalWrite(ledPin2, LOW);    // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
   delay(500);               // wait for a half second 
   } 
   else
{
     digitalWrite(ledPin2, LOW);	// turn LED off
}

}

You need to edit your posting to use code tags so we can read it.... Its all explained in the "Read this before posting" thread.

Basically its teeling you "hei I dont know what is "value" variable, I can see it in my scope :grin:
This is because you don't have any variable named "value"
Simple!

void loop()

{
{
analogVal0 = analogRead(analog0);
value /= 4; // <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< perhaps meant to be analogVal0? <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
digitalWrite (4, HIGH);
digitalWrite (6, value);
}

Sketch1:36: error: 'value' was not declared in this scope

The error message says it all. Where does your program declare the variable called value and define its type ?

Spending some time learning where curly braces are needed, and where they are optional, and where they plain look silly, would be time well spent. Most of yours are in the "plain look silly" category.

And now, before you post again, learn what Tools + Auto Format does, and how much easier it makes your code to read.

Thanks JimboZA for giving me a push in the right direction, the code shows no more errors.
Now only build it and test if it will really work as i planned it.

As for PaulS... As this was my FIRST attempt at writing code, some optional curly braces help me to understand and read the code a little better.

I use blank lines without curly braces when I want to separate chunks of code to make it easier to read.

I suggest you only use any sort of brackets ({[ where they are essential or else you run the risk of hard-to-find errors where one of your "decorative" brackets is mistaken by the compiler for a "real" bracket.

...R