Will these wireless modules work, if so, how?

Ok so basically in year 3 of my programming University course I hope to build and program an Arduino robot for my final thesis. Therefor I have decided to begin now to give me plenty of experimenting and research time. The robot will of course be wirelessly controlled and therefor I am looking for some cheap wireless methods to use such as Bluetooth.

Whilst looking through my old electronics box I discovered two old wireless modules which I pulled out an wireless weather station a while back, one was in the weather station that displayed the temp, and the other was in a small silver box which use to sit out side and transmit the temp indoors. The modules both have small aerials and both have three wires marked, V, G and D for power, ground and data i'm assuming. Now there must be a way I could send a simple signal from one to the other to turn on an LED or motor surly? Also I currently only have one Arduino so any signal testing would have to be possible via the same Arduino. Any help on this would be fantastic and the pictures of the modules are below via Photobucket.

Thanks!

www.photobucket.com/samuelcbarduino

V and G are voltage and ground. D connects to TX on your transmitter and RX on your receiver. Start at 2400 baud and see if it will accept faster.

Start simple by just transferring a single byte every second and blinking a LED on the receiver whenever a byte is received.

Thanks for the reply, and I know this might sound dumb as I am suppose to be doing programming, however I am still fairly new to it all so could you give me a simple bit of code to test it with please. I think I could write the receiving part but not the sending part? Thanks.

i suppose this will work with simple serial transmission:

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(1200);
}

void loop()
{
  Serial.print('A');
}
void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(1200);
}

void loop()
{
  while(Serial.available()<1);
  Serial.println(Serial.read());
}

i think this should work with the serial monitor of the IDE, if not, then you should use softwareserial (because it can be that the two serial data transmission get mixed, but i don’t think they will)

i start with 1200 because a lot of devices use 1200 too, i don’t think you should go lower, unless you really don’t see a thing of course

the output in the serial monitor should be 65 (ascii representation of A)

Thanks for the code, unfortunately because I only have one Arduino I have had to try and combined the code into one which I am hoping is still ok? I tried the code out and the serial monitor showed a long line of this:

A
79
A
125
A
106
A
87
A
245

Not sure why this is, most likely my code so here it is:

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(1200);
}

void loop()
{
  Serial.println('A');
  while(Serial.available()<1);
  Serial.println(Serial.read());
  delay(1000);
}

Edit: Whilst typing the above reply the serial monitor appears to have calmed down and now shows A, 71, A, 71, A etc. a lot with the odd flicker to random number.