Will this voltage doubler works with DC input?

Hi. I have been searching for a simple schema where I can just double the input voltage.

But a lot that I have seen are with a lot of components … etc…

I found some at: http://www.coolcircuit.com/circuit/voltage/

That seems to be pretty simple… but I just wanted to know if it will work if I use 3V DC as intput will output 6V DC?

I’m askinf because on input there are no “+” or “-” signs so aybe it is for AC as input.

Any help will be apreciated

tks a lot

vd2.gif

Vin needs to be a square wave for it to work.

So, a battery doesn't work?

tks

Must be clocked signal input. Perhaps this tutorial would be helpful:

http://www.eevblog.com/2013/05/25/eevblog-473-microcontroller-voltage-doubler/

hi! Thank you for your answer!!

Do you know if there is a whay to just double the voltage by a simple circuit like this one ?

cabecinhas: So, a battery doesn't work?

No.

cabecinhas: hi! Thank you for your answer!!

Do you know if there is a whay to just double the voltage by a simple circuit like this one ?

Use two batteries.

cabecinhas: hi! Thank you for your answer!!

Do you know if there is a whay to just double the voltage by a simple circuit like this one ?

No way to simply double a battery voltage without using switching methods. Just wire two batteries in series will double the voltage, is that simple enough?

Hi! Actually its a pretty small circuit so I'm using 2AA battery. I need about 6v in my application.

What's the voltage used for and how much current do you need?

For a "signal" (very low current) you can double a voltage with a simple op-amp circuit, but you need to power the op-amp with slightly more than you are trying to get out of it.

There are fairly simple capacitor-oscillator based voltage doublers if you need a small amount of power and you don't need efficiency (they do require a chip or other active circuitry).

If you need to "power" a circuit, you need an inductor-based voltage booster (again they require active circuitry). These are very efficient, but of course you can't get more power out than you put in... So if you double the voltage, you cut the current (approximately) in half. But normally if you are gong to power something, you start-out with enough voltage... Boosting (or inverting) the power supply voltage is usually a "last resort", like if you need to run something off a car battery and it needs more than 12V, etc.

P.S.

Actually its a pretty small circuit so I'm using 2AA battery. I need about 6v in my application

4 AA batteries. ;)

First of all, thank you for the answears!

I have foind an IC that maybe could help me. http://www.intersil.com/content/dam/Intersil/documents/icl7/icl7660.pdf

I'm just curious about its voltage when used as Positive Voltage Doubler

It says up to 18V when input 10v.

Could anyone tell me if this component could help me? in making about 6V from 3v?

Tks a lot in advance

Get one of these, you can connect your battery to it and dial any output voltage you want:

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=adjustable+dc+boost

How much current? That IC will work to generate -3V from +3V, which you could then connect the -3V to the common (ground) of your circuit ONLY IF the battery is not connected anywhere else but to the ICL7660 and the ground of the ICL7660 MUST NOT be connected to your circuit ground.

But this won't supply much current. The equivalent series resistance goes up as the input voltage goes down.

First of all, thank you for the answears!

I have foind an IC that maybe could help me.
http://www.intersil.com/content/dam/Intersil/documents/icl7/icl7660.pdf

I’m just curious about its voltage when used as Positive Voltage Doubler

It says up to 18V when input 10v.

Could anyone tell me if this component could help me? in making about 6V from 3v?

Tks a lot in advance

I have foind an IC that maybe could help me. http://www.intersil.com/content/dam/Intersil/documents/icl7/icl7660.pdf

I'm just curious about its voltage when used as Positive Voltage Doubler

Yes you can do that but it will only supply 20mA is that enough?

You might find this interesting. It won't generate 6V, however it will get more out of your batteries and provide more output current. It can take 5.5V max on its input.

The ST619LB is a step-up charge pump DC-DC converter which delivers a regulated 5 V ±4 % output at 30 mA and over temperature. The input voltage range is 2 V to 3.6 V (two battery cells).

EDIT: 8-Pin DIP: ST619LBN

It won't generate 6V, however it will get more out of your batteries and provide more output current. It can take 5.5V max on its input.

Seems to be what I'm looking for... But.. question.. where to find it? do u have an idea?

Yeah -sorry, looks like they're now obsolete (re: Mouser). DC DC switching regulators are now what's widely used - they cost more but are more efficient and provide higher output current. Just look for those that have step-up or boost capability. Here's just a few (based on specific search criteria) at Digi-Key, but there are many more.

EDIT: Needs extra components ... You'll basically end up with something that's costly and difficult to build. It's easier and cheaper to purchase pre-built, as suggested in reply #11.

cabecinhas:
It won’t generate 6V, however it will get more out of your batteries and provide more output current. It can take 5.5V max on its input.

Seems to be what I’m looking for… But… question… where to find it? do u have an idea?

Trust me, unless you have very tight constraint on weight the cheapest and more effective solution is to use 4 AA or AAA cells. Voltage boosters aren’t cost effective in your case because if you hope in saving on batteries cost by boosting the voltage of two consider you’ll discharge them a little more than twice the speed.
If you need 6V to power your arduino consider powering it with 4.5V (3xAA or 3xAAA) through the Vin pin.

Any conversion/boosting will waste part of your battery energy for the conversion.

These links (1, 2 ) show a very basic implementation of a switched mode voltage controller using the microcontroller it powers to also drive the circuit. The 2nd link also implements voltage regulation using an ADC pin to control the PWM pin driving the circuit.