Wind power arduino

Hi guys, i really need your help on this.

Hi have this anemometer: http://imgur.com/LTE00PZ

And im going to connect this dc motor (6V ; 250 mA): http://imgur.com/DPiREdM

The goal is to generate power from the motor to charge a battery that could power the arduino.

I'm having problems in getting a battery management system in which i could be charging the battery and at the same time powering the arduino. I would also have to know the status of the battery's life.

Can someone please help me?

you could use a voltage divider to see the status of your battery.

Please note that an Arduino needs at least 7 Volts to work properly ..

My problem is how to charge the battery at the same time as i power the arduino.

netrocos: The goal is to generate power from the motor to charge a battery that could power the arduino.

If you are thinking of driving a small DC motor with an anemometer and getting a useful amount of energy from it you are just wasting your time - sorry to be blunt.

An anemometer is designed for measuring wind speed and not generating power and small DC motors are ridiculously inefficient generators.

Frankly I suspect an effective wind generator that could power an Arduino would be completely uneconomic unless you are in a very windy area. Solar panels would probably make more sense.

I think some more research is required.

...R

If you are using the motor as a generator, you will be effecting the rotation speed of the motor. If the battery is low, the loading on the motor will be high so slow down the rotation.

Weedpharma

Before you plan on powering something with the anemometer/generator, wouldn’t it make sense to measure how much power it actually produces?

Here is the device: https://www.adafruit.com/products/1733

1) Use a diode to prevent the battery from feeding back into the anemometer.

2) Measure the battery voltage with a voltage divider.

3) When the battery voltage reaches the limit for that battery's chemistry (e.g. 4.2V for a lithium cell) burn power through a dummy load (light bulb, etc.) to keep it under that limit.

Regarding calculating the state of charge (percent power left) of the battery, the easiest way to do that is with a lookup table. Find a graph showing voltage vs. state of charge and use something like multiMap() to convert that to a percentage of life.