Windshield wiper delay controller

Has anyone made something like this? I have a 1990 Dodge RAM truck with a 318 engine and crank windows so I have just the basics, electronics wise. No speed control nothing. And it does not have a delay, its either on or off and I would like to build and install a delay circuit but have not seen any on the web and commercially made ones seem expensive. Is it something that a microcontroller would work for? Thanks for your help.

You could use an Arduino to operate a relay to turn the power to the wiper motor on and off - would that sort of thing be suitable?

Do the wipers have self-parking?

...R

The wipers are self parking. I use the main switch on the the end of the turn signal arm to work the wipers and intermittently turn them on and off that way as needed but the truck is 27 yrs old and when I wear out the switch it may be a major issue to install a new one so that is the reason I would like to hook up an intermittent wiper delay. Seems like it would be simple enough, but probably not.

I have thought of a rotary dial with several positions corresponding to seconds of delay and using differing values of resistor for each one, but since I am a noob I have no idea how that would work. I may not even need the microcontroller.

Thanks for your time and consideration.

Do a Google search on "Windshield Wiper Delay Circuits" and you will get all sorts of circuits you can build or buy ready made. They all provide a one or two second pulse to a relay that turns the wiper on long enough for the motor internal switch to complete the cycle. I saw one US made unit for $10 plus S&H, uses a potentiometer to vary the delay from 0 to 30 seconds and has an on-off switch on the pot.

chumley: Thanks for your time and consideration.

But you did not answer my principal question?

...R

Yes - to answer your direct question - a microcontroller can handle this easily. But so can a simple 555 circuit such as I made 40 years ago.

... refer to those above.

Allan

Read reply #5 again. Using an Arduino would be gross over-kill, and not the sort of thing to brag about with your mates.

Hi, Many years ago, and I tried to find it, I came accross a wiper dwell circuit that had a switch (ON-OFF) and button (WIPE).

When you turned it ON, it caused a WIPE, then when you needed another WIPE you pressed the WIPE BUTTON, this would cause another wipe and the control would store the time between switch ON and the button press.

And that would be the DWELL time.

Pressing the button again at anytime before the next wipe would modify the dwell time.

Holding the button down for say 2seconds would cause a wipe and reset the controller as if it had just been turned ON.

This mean't no guessing the dwell time.

Tom... :)

There's something to be said for simplicity.

Allan

TomGeorge: Hi, Many years ago, and I tried to find it, I came accross a wiper dwell circuit that had a switch (ON-OFF) and button (WIPE).

When you turned it ON, it caused a WIPE, then when you needed another WIPE you pressed the WIPE BUTTON, this would cause another wipe and the control would store the time between switch ON and the button press.

And that would be the DWELL time.

Pressing the button again at anytime before the next wipe would modify the dwell time.

Holding the button down for say 2seconds would cause a wipe and reset the controller as if it had just been turned ON.

This mean't no guessing the dwell time.

Tom... :)

Is this the one you're talking about? https://www.mcselec.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=172&Itemid=57

Hutkikz: Is this the one you're talking about? https://www.mcselec.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=172&Itemid=57

Thanks, no it isn't, but this was that long ago it was a digital/analog circuit, no controller as such. But thanks for the info, I'll file that URL away. Tom... :)

Due_unto: Do a Google search on "Windshield Wiper Delay Circuits" and you will get all sorts of circuits you can build or buy ready made. They all provide a one or two second pulse to a relay that turns the wiper on long enough for the motor internal switch to complete the cycle. I saw one US made unit for $10 plus S&H, uses a potentiometer to vary the delay from 0 to 30 seconds and has an on-off switch on the pot.

I did do that and found all sorts of schematics and units for sale at seemingly high prices, but could not find the one listed for $10. Sounds like just what I am looking for.

I am just learning how to convert a schematic to reality so they are still intimidating to me and require further experimentation.

The Arduino solution would work for sure, but be overkill as Nick_Pyner said above.

Here’s the site for the $10 unit.
https://store.qkits.com/wind-shield-wiper-timer-module-mxa041.html

Many thanks Due_unto

The Arduino solution would work for sure, but be overkill

Well, what you could do is build the prototype circuit using, say, an Uno, then "shrinkify" it using an attiny45/85. You could also use a MOSFET instead of the relay. So it could be an interesting little project that you could learn some cool stuff from.

Well, I did two things. I purchased a $10 unit that Due_unto told me about and I also found a plan that uses a Mosfet in place of the relay and I think I will try to build that circuit just to learn something, hopefully.

Thanks for everyones input.

Another project I am thinking abut is using a Arduino as a mail notifier when my mail has been delivered. Not really necessary but would be interesting. I have found "solutions" on the net but none that I particularly like yet. One of my concerns is that the mailman will think there is a bomb in the box. We get substitute people and my regular guy would know what it is but the subs may not.

Disguise the circuit as a small parcel?

One I built years ago and used on '65 Pontiac, used scr's.

Might have been a Siliconchip magazine issue

Good idea.

But. A modern logic-level mosfet would have a much lower on-resistance, and no minimum voltage drop, so wouldn't get so hot. And the wiper internal brushed rotating contact should keep it going round to the stop position.

You need a flywheel diode, of course.

Allan