Wireless power transmission

Sorry, I'm an American...

Sorry, I actually speak the King's English

I do not know about other places, but in the U.S.A., the letter 'z' is used much more that it is in the U.K.

Could it be because we watched "Zorro" when we were kids ?

raschemmel: There is no vonnection so you can't reallty call them Option-1 and Option-2 because wifi and bluetooth are not charging technologies. They ar DATA TRANSMISSION technologies and proximity charging is NOT a data transmission technolgy. In short , they should NEVER share the the same paragrapgh. Talk about one and then wait a day before bringing up the other one.

Thank you for the response, i was just confused because (Mauried) told me that there is no difference.

That's odd .

I thought everyone on the forum was always correct...

raschemmel: Sorry, I'm an American...

Sorry, I actually speak the King's English

We are not amused.

raschemmel: That's odd .

I thought everyone on the forum was always correct...

I was posting the question to see the (difference) between the two. If you say that they have nothing related then could you explain why, please? and is my comment #10 correct the way i explained it? Thanks

I already explained it. One is procimity charging technology with absolutely nothing to do wgh data transmisdion whilewifi & bluetooth are exclusively data transmission with nothing to do with charging. Why isthat so hard to understand ?

"We are not amused..."

The classic "Royal" "We" ...

Paul__B: Exactly. The UK "original" uses "s", the American uses "zee".

You clearly don't have the Oxford English Dictionary then! These are greek endings and z is logically correct. The OED recommends -IZE, but recognizes that -ISE is commonly used in British English.

And its pronouned -IZE of course, not that pronounciation is a good guide in English anyway!

The complication is some -ISE only verbs like advise, promise, excise, see https://www.lexico.com/en/grammar/ize-ise-or-yse

raschemmel:
The classic “Royal” “We” …

Not to be confused with the “Privvy”. :roll_eyes:

If you search the reference I gave, it is suggested that Victoria was in fact, not using the royal “We” on the particular occasion apocryphally recorded.