wireless transmission from steering wheel for cruise control install

good day, arduino users,

I am putting a new engine into a wonderful sports car which has no cruise control, even tho built in '07. The new engine requires a new honda computer and is capable of CC. I do not want to install wires along the column if practical, so i’d rather use BlueTooth or … for input. I’m a retired engineer and am familiar with the arduino, c/c++, ICs,… The Arduino can be on the floor, very close to cg. I seek the lightest/simplest (preferably digital) input push buttons (2) to glue to steering wheel without injury (it’s a momo). It’s ok for wires/transmitter to be glued to back of steering wheel as well as front, but of course light weight is paramount. The total distance is <1.5m. I thank you in advance, and hope i have included sufficient info. Peace.

I'll leave it to others to discuss the feasibility of wireless transmission inside a car.

But I wonder how you want to connect a wireless receiver to the car control logic (CAN bus?).

Furthermore I'm not sure how you want to connect the buttons, on the steering wheel, to an Arduino on the floor, without using cables. Even if you want to replace just these cables by wireless transmission, a sender in the steering wheel must be powered somehow, so that some cabling seems inevitable to me. Can you show a sketch of your intended installation?

I think you will need an Arduino on the steering wheel as well as one on the floor. For the steering wheel you can make a very small bundle with a bare-bones Atmega 328 and an nRF24L01+ 2.4GHz transceiver.

If you plan to use a Honda Cruise Control computer that is approved by the various regulatory authorities and your motor insurers that’s fine. In that case the Arduino will only be acting as a remote switch.

I would not use an Arduino and your own program to carry out anything as dangerous as controlling a car moving on the public highway. For one thing you don’t have access to safe test facilities to prove your program in all possible circumstances.

If that is what you have in mind I suggest you discuss it with your motor insurer first. Let us know what they say.

…R

I apologize for not yet knowing how to respond to your comments; i can't say i'm sure to which suggestion this responds. I thank you for your suggestions, and in particular for your concern for safety. I an using the honda computer (the drivetrain in question is from Japan, but their smog controls and computer interfaces are identical), so i won't need to change anything, except: * most important: finish reviewing the IC tutorials; it's amazing how much i've forgotten. * because 5v is available at the steering wheel (for the horn), my hope is that using a tiny-capacitance input from there 1. will not affect the horn relay, which is inductive (responds to dL/dt, producing amperage), because the cap only cares about dC/dt, producing only voltage (well, almost; the reactance charges the cap and the resistance is heat). The most notable thing about the charging time is its brevity, so the increment of amperage produced is the product of C (in picofarads, so it's TINY) and dV(t)/dt, which is the slope of VoltageToTime. Right now, i'm working on assuming that slope is necessarily flat. This assumes, of course, that my other assumptions are correct. BUT, if it becomes a concern, i can just use s ribbon cable; wireless is not worth a lot of problems. I'll let you know how it works out, esp if i am able to go wireless--i expect that would be of more interest to you as an experimenter. Peace.

Whoops, wait....the slope of dV/dt is certainly not flat; it rises quickly--as for any charging cap--but i am concerned with its relative duration, which is brief in the extreme. I think. Back to reading.

dondemeritt:
my hope is that using a tiny-capacitance input from there 1. will not affect the horn relay, which is inductive (responds to dL/dt, producing amperage), because the cap only cares about dC/dt, producing only voltage (well, almost; the reactance charges the cap and the resistance is heat). The most notable thing about the charging time is its brevity, so the increment of amperage produced is the product of C (in picofarads, so it's TINY) and dV(t)/dt, which is the slope of VoltageToTime. Right now, i'm working on assuming that slope is necessarily flat. This assumes, of course, that my other assumptions are correct. BUT, if it becomes a concern, i can just use s ribbon cable; wireless is not worth a lot of problems. I'll let you know how it works out, esp if i am able to go wireless--i expect that would be of more interest to you as an experimenter. Peace.

Whoops, wait....the slope of dV/dt is certainly not flat; it rises quickly--as for any charging cap--but i am concerned with its relative duration, which is brief in the extreme. I think. Back to reading.

I have no idea what that is all about. An Arduino (or an Atmega MCU) at the steering wheel needs a steady flow of current at a suitable voltage. Read the Atmega 328 datasheet for typical data.

...R