Wireless USB Connectivity

I am working on a project for work, involving integrating wireless connections to specialized handtools. Currently we are in the research/proof of concept phase, and the jist is that i need to click the button on a wireless mouse(or any other similar paired wirless unit, it has to have a "dongle" that follows with it to work), and have it turn on a light. However, it needs to be run through a small portable micro controller, no computer involved. I'm at a serious loss on how to even begin going about this. I've ordered and will begin working with my arduino pro and the smirf unit. are there any aruino parts that would allow a wirless usb mouse to be plugged into, and controlled by the arduino? Thanks

What are you trying to do?

A wireless mouse isn't really 'controlled' by USB. It's got no outputs that could tell you it is controlled. It controls the thing it's plugged into.

If you are wirelessly connecting to a thing that you built or programmed, why does it have to be USB?

MorganS: What are you trying to do?

A wireless mouse isn't really 'controlled' by USB. It's got no outputs that could tell you it is controlled. It controls the thing it's plugged into.

If you are wirelessly connecting to a thing that you built or programmed, why does it have to be USB?

Basically, we are trying to integrate momentary switches into the grip of a tool (a dead-man switch essentially). The tool has to be able to be linked and un-linked from a motor unit, wirelessly. We want to utilize something with a dongle, to act as a key. Plug the dongle into the motor, then that tool is connected to that motor. In testing, not using a dongle left room for accidents if someone had not yet paired their tool to the motor, but had connected the power. It doesn't have to be a usb "dongle", that was just where we were stuck currently.

I'm not sure what you mean by "tool" but that's not necessary to continue.

You want to 'pair' two devices so that the 'motor' knows that the 'tool' is switched on, in range and someone has their finger on the deadman button? That seems simple enough and shouldn't require USB anywhere.

There's lots of different ways of doing this. The first thing that will help you decide which technology to pursue is how much battery power you have available on the 'tool' and how long you want it to run. If it's a coin-cell battery and you want it to run for a year between battery changes, then the answers are different.

Pretty much any radio technology will work for you. It could even be infra-red, if you insist that the 'tool' can always see the 'motor'. Have a look through the Sparkfun category here: https://www.sparkfun.com/categories/79 Obviously they don't sell every product available but they have a pretty good selection that will get you "in range" from a few metres up to anywhere on the planet. The Nordic and Bluetooth categories might also be useful to you.

Then you have to look at the environment this will be operated in. Some kind of industrial facility? Lots of big motors pumping out electromagnetic interference? How many of these 'tools' will be operating at one time in range of each other?

I would start with a pair of the Sparkfun 434MHz modules and have the Arduino in the 'tool' transmit a unique code like "42" a hundred times per second. The receiver must receive that unique code at least once every 500 milliseconds or it lights an LED and triggers the deadman shutdown on the 'motor'. This is easy to do with Arduinos.

It is an industrial application. There could be 6-8 motor units in a 10'x10' area. It is a hand tool of sorts is all I can say. The reason we wanted a usb, or similar dongle device, is to prevent two tools from being paired with one motor at the same time, (as this could lead to serious injury if someone walking away gripped their tool, activating the motor attached to the new unit of someone else). Follow? Due to minimal space and weight, we have been trying to keep the arduino, or whatever "controller", on the motor. On the tool we essentially want to have the smallest board possible, with only a power unit, a few buttons for the deadman switch, and signal transmitter.

However, if we could set up the signal receiver, that it could be re-synced with a new transmitter quickly, while then forgetting the former transmitter, we could do away with the possibility of an accidental activation. Do you know of anything along these lines, ardunio or not?

You can use multiple pairs of nRF24L01+ transceivers in close proximity without them getting confused. Each pair uses a different "address"

I got my nRF24s working with this Tutorial

I suggest you use the TMRh20 version of the RF24 library - it solves some problems from the ManiacBug version

The pair of programs in this link could provide the foundation for what you want.

...R