Wirelessly use the Arduino

So, I want to be able to recieve sensor data from my arduino from a distance, for RC projects. I also want to transmit to it. Right now, I am using This to do so, but it does not work well through walls or farther away than about 100 feet. I'm not sure what to use to do so, or if I just need to attatch something to the transciever, but is there a way to communicate with it at greater distances and through walls? Thanks! Danny

There are rf24 radios with a real antenna, a preamp and low noise amplifier that are supposed to have much better range than the PC board antenna radios. Look for RF24L01PA.

http://yourduino.com/sunshop2/index.php?l=product_detail&p=190
http://yourduino.com/sunshop2/index.php?l=product_detail&p=191

Dannyboy001:
So, I want to be able to recieve sensor data from my arduino from a distance, for RC projects. I also want to transmit to it.

I’m a fan of the Nordic nRF24L01+ modules but even the longer range versions of these transceivers might not be a great match for this application. If you’re RC radio gear uses a 2.4GHz system then you’ll likely be better off with a different frequency for your telemetry.

There are 900MHz XBee modules which have much longer range than the 2.4GHz XBee modules. A 900MHz radio will be less likely to interfere with your RC gear.

With other things being equal, lower frequency radio waves will have better range than higher frequency radio waves (something about the physics of radio).

The downside to the 900MHz XBee modules is their price. They cost more than many of the other alternatives. There are likely other 900MHz modules (or other frequencies) with similar range and at a low price but I don’t know where to find them or what they’re called. I believe 400ish Hz radios are also used for data. I believe I saw one of these lower frequency modules on sale not too long ago. I found one of these modules. I think it’s not powerful enough to do much good but there may be other modules in this frequency range which would work well. I think the safest bet for good range would be the 900MHz XBee.

I’ve heard there some sort of filter one should use with RC gear if you’re using another radio next to it. I think the guys who fly FPV use a “low pass filter” on one of the antennas. At least this is what I’m remembering from watching YouTube videos on the subject. I think the filter is supposed to remove some of the harmonics which can interfere with the other radio but I’m just repeating what I heard. I don’t know where to get these filters or how to use them.

I think the warning against using two radio systems with the same frequencies sounds reasonable. I’m sure lower frequency signals have better range than higher frequency signals (other things being equal). High frequency signals can transfer more data. Apparently 5.8GHz video transmission looks great.

Another options is to use a walkie talkie system and use a microcontroller as a modem for the radio.

I know there are some radio systems with have built-in telemetry but I don’t know much more about these systems than that they exist.

So, I saw those antennae that were posted, is there any way to drill a few holes into the transcievers I already have and solder them in, or is that a terrible idea and will it break them?

Dannyboy001: So, I saw those antennae that were posted, is there any way to drill a few holes into the transcievers I already have and solder them in, or is that a terrible idea and will it break them?

I wouldn't try to add a $10 antenna to a $2 nRF24L01+ module but you might want to try adding a wire. You could try drilling through the beginning of the trace antenna and soldering a wire antenna in its place. A 1/4 wavelength of a 2.4GHz frequency is 31.25mm. You could attempt using a 31mm wire antenna.

I have my doubts something like this would work since high frequency RF is really tricky stuff and I'd think the support components on the PCB are likely tuned for the PCB antenna.

Personally, I think it's worth risking one of these $2 modules to see if a wire antenna would improve the range.