Word of advice

If you ever figure out that manually desoldering stuff from a pcb for the sake of salvaging the components takes forever, you can throw it on a gas stove, but in that case... just watch out for the exploding capacitors flying everywhere and everything catching on fire all the time.

My father holds boards in pliers, hits the back with a torch flame (gently) and then whacks them on the edge of the metal pulls bin to make the parts fall off. It works sorta okay.

  • please do NOT use the stove again.. (for food)

  • I sometimes have thrown boards in my toaster oven and picked parts off with tweezers.

Works.. but perfect.

Using the RIGHT tools also works.

If you're trying to salvage parts from a duff board , what's the betting that the one you want is the broken
part?

I always use new parts.. unless I've salvaged expensive bits from a known good board.

And I'm not convinced that your method would be more useful than impressive and smelly.

Might be fun if you're really cross with it!

regards
Allan.

I was honestly most

DrAzzy:
My father holds boards in pliers, hits the back with a torch flame (gently) and then whacks them on the edge of the metal pulls bin to make the parts fall off. It works sorta okay.

I know, right! I do the same thing, just use a stove...

xl97:

  • please do NOT use the stove again.. (for food)

  • I sometimes have thrown boards in my toaster oven and picked parts off with tweezers.

Works.. but perfect.

B... but! I don't wanna die of hunger! ;_;

allanhurst:
If you're trying to salvage parts from a duff board , what's the betting that the one you want is the broken
part?

I always use new parts.. unless I've salvaged expensive bits from a known good board.

And I'm not convinced that your method would be more useful than impressive and smelly.

Might be fun if you're really cross with it!

regards
Allan.

It was an old motherboard! I mostly wanted the power supply connector, which is not super easy to get by normally and then some push buttons! Easy peasy.

pwillard:
Using the RIGHT tools also works.

As in, a desoldering station or a hot air gun? I do this kind of stuff about once every few years when the amount of old pcbs lying around gets unbearable! :smiley:

Done carefully, the torch method I described produces working pulls most of the time.

Well, if you need inductors, it's a great way to get some; they're unlikely enough to fail, and expensive enough to buy, that they're worth pulling.

Occasionally I've also seen other interesting parts worth pulling. PowerMac chip cards are a bonanza of low voltage high value 1210 caps, and I got some pretty looking MELF diodes from a motherboard. And I always pull crystals of speeds I don't have, in case I ever need one.

There are two problems with the stove - you can't apply the heat from the top (we found that to be critical, and precluded the use of any torch that doesn't have a hose, since you can't use a torch if the tank is upside down - you get liquid out and it turns into more of a flamethrower than a torch) - and you're doing it your kitchen, getting probably-not-lead-free solder and parts contaminated with same all over the place. Things should be washed very thoroughly after doing something like this.

Also, you do that INSIDE?! Doesn't that make the whole place reek like, uh, like burning circuit boards? My father has no sense of smell but finds the fumes offensive.

My father holds boards in pliers, hits the back with a torch flame (gently) and then whacks them on the edge of the metal pulls bin to make the parts fall off. It works sorta okay.

Once you learn how long it takes for the solder to melt (one or two seconds ) , the torch method is very efficient and does NOT damage ICs if done by an experienced salvager who has acquired the "knack" of knowing just when to pull the flame away.