Zero vs Due

Hi,

Anyone wish to comment on why someone would choose the new 32 bit arduino zero over the 32 bit Due? (Apart from size and I/O). They are clearly different in spec and I can see if you are used to the uno and need 32 bits the zero is a good choice, but if you are using a Due why would you change to the new zero? The new zero looks great but I don't quite get why we need both the zero and due unless it is simply down to size and I/O.

Will all arduinos go from 8 to 32 bit do you think?????

Any opinions welcome.

If you compare the features there are significant differences that would make one or the other better for a particular project. The Zero has a RTC, the Due does not. The Due has a much faster processor, and much more memory (both FLASH and RAM), which is needed for some applications, not others. The Zero has a real DAC, not just PWMs (not sure if the Due has a DAC or not...). One MAJOR plus in the Zero is the built-in hardware debugger and JTAG I/F which would make real debugging possible, instead of being stuck using just print statements.

Anyway, they are apples and oranges.

Regards,
Ray L.

" author=RayLivingston ;
If you compare the features there are significant differences that would make one or the other better for a particular project. The Zero has a RTC, the Due does not. The Due has a much faster processor, and much more memory (both FLASH and RAM), which is needed for some applications, not others. The Zero has a real DAC, not just PWMs (not sure if the Due has a DAC or not...). One MAJOR plus in the Zero is the built-in hardware debugger and JTAG I/F which would make real debugging possible, instead of being stuck using just print statements.

Anyway, they are apples and oranges.

Regards,
Ray L.
"

You need to look at the specifications again, the due does indeed have a RTC. and the due has two DAC 12-bits resolution outputs. the due also has "12" 12-bits PWM outputs and has "12" 12-bits AD inputs..

the Zero has one DAC 10-bits resolution output. the Zero also has six 10-bits AD inputs. I'm not sure about the PWM outputs, but I suspect that they are 10-bits as well.

I'm not sure why anyone would want to choose this board, over the due or the teensy 3.1 . I'm sure someone will have a need for it. For me I prefer the due or teensy 3.1 . at least the teensy 3.1 is 5 V tolerant.

Zero has attracted my attention given its SAMD21 with USB full speed hosting and debugging interface, but in general, I see Zero as Leo on steroids and theoretically suitable for some of my robotic apps. Arduino has promised Zero to be available for purchase in US next Monday. I hope this delayed releasing has not already deteriorated its expected success. In reference to Due, I've gotten used to it and it is my true workmonster. In my last project Due was able to govern 1modem w/SMTP/GPS, 3pumps, 3sensors, 6relays, 1WiFi, 1LCD, 1Keypad, 1RTC(external), 1DataLogger, 1Canbus and 1accel! The problem with the internal RTC is a design flaw. Currently the reset button on Due is tied to the NRSTB pin (instead of NRST) that clears the backup region of the SAM3X including the RTC. Also, the Arduino/Atmel never broke out the Ethernet pins. Regards,

p

Here the Arduino Zero US releasing note:

Arduino Zero for purchase 15th june 2015

Great discussion guys. I think the jtag might be the defining feature that truly separates the two. I think the arduino crowd are trying to be more than just a hobbyist tool (we know it isn't but there is a perception it is just like Lego or meccanno). They are now realising serious kit that for some may be preferential to msp430 or the like. The recent 32 bit Due is serious kit but I didn't quite get where the zero fitted in.

Phil

There's several headers on the Due board marked "debug." I think it has a lot of capability there but I've never seen any connectors that might plug into those headers.

The RTC on the Due is unusable on the current board.

The 12-bit DAC is very limited in output voltage. Just trying to find this specification in the datasheet is very difficult because they don't like to admit how limited it is.

You can also assign a portion of memory as virtual EEPROM on the Zero, .... That's a feature the SAM3X didn't support, so for storing things like calibration constants to non-volatile memory at run-time... that will survive a restart.... well that's advantage ZERO..

Is the Zero compatible with the Android ADK? While support for the ADK project appears to have vanished since 2012, there has been some development going on through the UDOO and if the Zero proves more popular than the Due or UDOO, built-in Android Accessory support in a smaller form factor might prove to be a major selling point (admittedly for a very specific audience).

Got a feeling DUE going by by

jpalm32:
Got a feeling DUE going by by

Unfortunately IMHO it never got of the ground.

Few hobbyist will drive Mustang when Beetle will blink LED's.
Hobbyist are conditioned by Setup / Loop scheme not to use interrupts and "native " USB port is practically invisible for many serious users busy juggling "multiple" serial devices on Uno and derivatives.
New technology of Zero is wonderful, but have you checked the "business indicators" on e-way AKA customer is always right?

PS I got two and working on third Due embedded application.

Vaclav:
Unfortunately IMHO it never got of the ground.

Few hobbyist will drive Mustang when Beetle will blink LED's.

This is a good analogy. The Due does fill in certain needs for those who wish for more I/O. What I like about the DAC on the Zero is that it goes from ground to Vcc. With the Due, you need a shift and amplify circuit if you want the output signal to go from ground to 3.3 or 5.

I don't think the 8-bit boards should go away. They still can be used for a lot projects and are a great tool for learning the basics, kind of like a gateway technology. :sunglasses: