4 Pelteir Plate Water Bottle wired to Arduino Uno

Note - I plan to use the Arduino Starter kit to make this project.

Hey everyone,

I've had an idea for a project recently and I would like to get some insight on its plausibility. Is it possible to heat and cool a bottle of water using 4 pelteir plates? I'd like to heat up or cool a bottle of water using 2 pelteirs for heating and 2 for cooling. Could the amount of power for the peltiers to function be supplied from a laptop, computer, or battery pack? Thanks guys.

Edit- the role of the Arduino is to program in some safety features or some things to help the circuit function better if necessary. For example, a feature I want to add in is if the cold pelteirs are on, the hot peltiers are off if nessecary. I might add an LCD to display which setting is on/off if I can (example: Cold: ON, Hot: OFF)

Google is your friend, you will learn more in ten minutes than waiting around here.

What is the role of the Arduino?

BTW you may know that Peltier devices work both ways, you won't need heating elements and cooling elements, just plain Peltier elements. Unless you literally mean heating and cooling the water at the same time.

They take a relatively large amount of power. I think you will find the need for a largish battery pack.

Good luck and HTH.

a7

Hey, thanks for the response!

Yeah, what I should have said/mean is that 2 peltiers will serve the role of heating and 2 peltiers will serve to cool. I made an edit to fix that and to answer your question about the role of the Arduino for any future readers. Again, Thanks! Will surf the Googles and Internets.

-czhang07

A single Peltier element typically takes 12V at about 6 Amperes, or roughly 70 Watts to run. They are very inefficient.

For cooling, you need a decent finned heat sink and fan on the hot side, to remove the heat pumped out, plus the heat generated by the Peltier element. If you don't remove that heat, the element may simply burn out.

I've never used a Peltier device...

If you already have them, just start doing some experiments. ;)

In general, heating & cooling takes a lot of energy and it takes a lot of energy to heat or cool liquids. P.S. It also depends on the starting temperature and the ambient temperature.

You'll probably need something in the ballpark of 25 or 50W, depending on how fast you need to heat/cool and depending on if there is any insulation. (I'm just thinking about the amount of heat you get from a regular incandescent light bulb).

Power (wattage) is calculated as Voltage x Current, so a 12V battery at 4 Amps is almost 50W. If you know the current you can calculate the amp-hours required from the battery.

For heating, a resistor (a "power resistor" of course) is 100% efficient so that might be better for heating.

Technically... All of the energy dissipated by the Peltier has to be converted to heat too, but since it's cold on one side I'm just not sure if you can use or transfer the total energy as easily as using a resistor (or with regular-simple heating element which is essentially a resistor).

If you don't have the Peltier devices yet, you might just buy some power resistors and experiment with heating to see how much energy it takes. That should get you in the ballpark for how much energy you'll need. (Cooling with the Peltier is probably less efficient than heating.)

Yeah, what I should have said/mean is that 2 peltiers will serve the role of heating and 2 peltiers will serve to cool.

The Peltier gets hot on one side and cold on the other side, at the same time.

Do not try to hold one of the devices in your hand while experimenting. They get hot on one side REALLY fast! Paul

czhang07: Hey, thanks for the response!

Yeah, what I should have said/mean is that 2 peltiers will serve the role of heating and 2 peltiers will serve to cool. I made an edit to fix that and to answer your question about the role of the Arduino for any future readers. Again, Thanks! Will surf the Googles and Internets.

-czhang07

Why do you need separate pairs of Peltiers, one pair to cool and one to heat. You can use one pair to heat and cool, all you do is reverse the current through the Peltier pairs. No matter if you are cooling or heating you will probably need as advised earlier, a heatsink and fan on the outside of the project to circulate air to cool a hot heatsink, or to heat a cool heatsink. It all ahs to do with heat energy TRANSFER. Tom.. :)

DVDdoug: Technically... All of the energy dissipated by the Peltier has to be converted to heat too, but since it's cold on one side I'm just not sure if you can use or transfer the total energy as easily as using a resistor (or with regular-simple heating element which is essentially a resistor).

A Peltier functions as a heat pump - it transfers heat from one side to the other. It adds heat - the amount corresponding to the-power it uses - to the hot side. It is generally less efficient than a compressor-based refrigeration cycle though that is in itself not terribly efficient either. So it is nevertheless much more effective at heating as long as it can maintain a certain differential between hot and cold sides - the cold side will not go below a certain temperature less than the hot side.

As with the compressor-based refrigeration cycle this makes it a much more effective form of heating than plain resistor elements which is why "reverse cycle" Air Conditioning is so much more economical than plain electric bar/ fan/ "oil column" home heating.

DVDdoug: Cooling with the Peltier is probably less efficient than heating.

Most certainly. :grinning: