Arduino + Mechanical Clock

I Have a electrical diagram of a circuit I used on my last clock. The pendulum cycles in 1 second intervals driving the second hand at 1 RPM. It is a wood geared clock and it is very accrete as it also has a crystal timer. My question: If I supply the diagram would someone be able to tell me if an Arduino would be able to preform this task? It functions as described above in this thread. It also has a LED red and green that is used in adjusting the pendulum to the 1 second beat.
Thanks Jerry

jerryhonkanen:
If I supply the diagram would someone be able to tell me if an Arduino would be able to preform this task?

The only way to answer that question is after you post the diagram.

I've seen this done with a negative resistance system.

It is not something that requires an Arduino. In the past, it has always been done by a simple transistor driver with two coil windings - one drives the base as the magnet passes over, then the collector provides an impulse to the second winding. Same as a Brushless motor.

During the 'idle" phase charge a capacitor then when you need the "kick" discharge the capacitor through the coil. That way your system load current is relatively low and your capacitor can discharge a much higher current into a low impedance coil. That concept is used by model train set guys to drive their points (switches in US parlance)

This is the circuit I used on my clock and I would like to know if it would work with Arduino Uno? This circuit will also need to be programed
Thanks jerry

Sure, why not? The main IC seems to be just an MCU. Are you implying that you don’t have the code for the clock you built?

Also, it seems strange that you present this now as something that you have already made, when at the beginning of the thread, you talk as if you don’t know what will work. Very strange.

My question is Will an Arduino do what this circuit does? I do not know anything about programing it The one I used on my clock was built and programed for me, but was a little costly. The Arduino Uno Is more reasonably priced and I use one on my laser engraving CNC, which is also programed via the internet. I am in the process of building my 5th wood geared clock and I thought I would like to try an Arduino.
Thank you
Jerry

jerryhonkanen:
This is the circuit I used on my clock and I would like to know if it would work with Arduino Uno? This circuit will also need to be programmed
578dc164b1b19affbc960a169f4b39886d583ecc.jpg

Ah!

So what was all the nonsense in the first post about “a sensor that detects the bob approaching …”?

Either it is self-driving in which case you do not need an Arduino in the first place, merely a regenerative feedback circuit with one or two transistors, or you wish it to run from a clock crystal, in which case you do not need to use the sensor at all, nor do you need an Arduino which you would have to modify substantially to operate from the 32.768 kHz clock crystal instead of the less accurate resonator already provided.

I don't know anything about "a sensor that detects the bob approaching ..."? That is not my post. What I think you are telling me is that to use the one that works and forget about the Arduino.
Thank you for the help.
Jerry

jerryhonkanen:
I don't know anything about "a sensor that detects the bob approaching ..."? That is not my post. What I think you are telling me is that to use the one that works and forget about the Arduino.
Thank you for the help.
Jerry

Well, you said, "It functions as described above in this thread."

jerryhonkanen:
I don't know anything about "a sensor that detects the bob approaching ..."? That is not my post.

No, I was confusing you with the OP, now apparently departed.

Mind you, that resistor, capacitor and two diodes along the bottom looks suspiciously like some sort of feedback mechanism.

I am sorry I am not an electric person I am more into mechanical things. I have built some wood gear clocks and was hoping I could get an Arduino to run My 5th clock.
VID 20160331 143841 - YouTube This link is my 4th clock.
http://oldcharms.com/Wood_Gear_Clocks.html This is a link to a video of my old clocks and other stuff.
Thanks again Jerry

Here we sell well illustrated why it is sometimes better to start your own thread when your question/problem is not identical to the original poster's.

polymorph:
...it is sometimes better to start your own thread...

Thread split.

jerryhonkanen:
I Have a electrical diagram of a circuit I used on my last clock. The pendulum cycles in 1 second intervals driving the second hand at 1 RPM. It is a wood geared clock and it is very accrete as it also has a crystal timer. My question: If I supply the diagram would someone be able to tell me if an Arduino would be able to preform this task? It functions as described above in this thread. It also has a LED red and green that is used in adjusting the pendulum to the 1 second beat.
Thanks Jerry

Yes. In fact, you could use a Teensy and add a 32.xxxkHz clock crystal to it, or add a Clock module/shield to an Arduino.

I like your work Jerry!

I'm sure you could work Arduinos into your clocks - i have made about a dozen electronic clocks, even going as far as building a TCO with a thermistor, crystal and a tiny84. Recently I started cutting gears with a laser cutter, so I am now following your work.

Sorry if I'm doing this wrong but I never done this here before. I'm not an electrician and I was looking for a way to use an Arduino for my next build.

Yes. In fact, you could use a Teensy and add a 32.xxxkHz clock crystal to it, or add a Clock module/shield to an Arduino.

Thank you for this help. I will see if I can figure it out I have the timing spring built after the Eureka Clock winding, made from Oak with a internal spring. It works just like the pendulum clock and the electro magnet system would be great to keep it going. Timing it might be a little tricky as the clock will need to be done to the point where all the friction parts are part of the equation.

If I continue this I will try to figure out how to start another post.
And thanks again for the help
Jerry

If you're basing the time on a crystal, you would be nuts not to use a DS3231. Nothing else comes close for accuracy, unless you want to spend the big bucks. It powers up by default with the 32Khz output enabled, so you don't even have to connect it to an Arduino. A binary counter will give you power of two multiples of 1Hz from that.