Feasibility for Bluetooth connected and controlled power outlet

Hello,

Here's the outcome I want.

A power outlet box controlled by a wearable skin temp sensor. I want the box to turn a device on and off based on skin temp.

Skin temp rises, turns on power. Falls to back "normal range" range and shuts off power.

Non-medical application. Skin temp required, not core temp. I get the difference.

I think I know some of the required items such as SRD-05VDC-SL-C 5V Relay and the UNO R3.

It's the wearable bluetooth skin temp sensor that I am not sure about. I've seen the Lilypad sensor but not certain how well that will work.

I may have to settle for a thin wire solution from the sensor to the controller.

Any thoughts or comments are welcomed.

Thanks!

I have a device using an UNO and an IR temperature sensor.

#include <IR_Thermometer_Sensor_MLX90614.h>

If I push the sensor into my ear, I get the body temperature. Testing skin temperature is no problem.
The sensor can also be directed into motors, showing the brush temperature…… Just make shure that the collecting eye is covered to certain percentage of it angle.

You could use two Arduino Nano 33 BLE. One would be used as sensor node and one would control the power outlet. There are already examples for two BLE nodes working together in the Arduino BLE library.

File -> Examples -> ArduinoBLE -> Central -> LED Control File -> Examples -> ArduinoBLE -> Peripheral -> LED

https://store.arduino.cc/arduino-nano-33-ble-with-headers

hnspty: required items such as SRD-05VDC-SL-C 5V Relay and the UNO R3.

Klaus_K: You could use two Arduino Nano 33 BLE. One would be used as sensor node and one would control the power outlet.

This may be OK as a casual intellectual exercise, but it looks like everybody wants to re-invent the wheel, and thus the likelihood of getting a square one is ever-present. Bluetooth, and WiFi, controlled power outlets have been around for some time, You can even get plug-in adapters - no electrician required. The Bluetooth ones are disparaged but, in this instance, the limited range may actually limit this project's worst aspect - the likelihood of unintended operations. Indeed, if BLE is used, you may even get something useful out of its RSSI facility. Either way, I would imagine a Nano 33 BLE would be a better choice than a Lilypad.

One might google "smart outlet" and similar to see what is currently available. Back in the day x10.