ground pins in arduino uno

hey guys , please help, i was wondering if it makes any difference if i connect my ground wires to different ground pins. arnt these ground pins all connected together on the arduino after all.

, i was wondering if it makes any difference if i connect my ground wires to different ground pins.

No they are both the same.

Grumpy_Mike: No they are both the same.

so basically all the ground pins are connected to one another on the arduino?

[quote author=george barakat link=msg=3263796 date=1494969894] so basically all the ground pins are connected to one another on the arduino? [/quote] Yes. How could it be anything else?

There are 4 ground pins on the basic Arduino. Two of which are at the power connector, Which can take the most current and should be used whenever possible. 1 pin is on the opposite side of the board, on the 10 pin heather. this ground is intended for use with the I2C serial port that it is next to along with the digital I/O pins on that side of the board, and should only be used for lighter loads. The last one is on the six pin SPI header, And is intended to be used for the SPI bus.

Note: if you have any inductive loads, or higher current loads It should be connected as close to the power supply is possible. This is to ground pins available on the power connector. This helps isolate inductive noise from going across the Arduino circuitry.

Uh... they're all tied to the ground plane... It shouldn't make a difference which one you use. If you're putting so much current through the ground pins that this is a concern, you're probably going damage the board no matter which ground you use....

I know EMI is of virtually no consequence to Arduino hobbyists but purely out of curiosity I'd love to see a model of the current and interference pattern in the ground plane with various types of load connected to the different ground pins.

promacjoe2: There are 4 ground pins on the basic Arduino. Two of which are at the power connector, Which can take the most current and should be used whenever possible. 1 pin is on the opposite side of the board, on the 10 pin heather. this ground is intended for use with the I2C serial port that it is next to along with the digital I/O pins on that side of the board, and should only be used for lighter loads. The last one is on the six pin SPI header, And is intended to be used for the SPI bus.

Note: if you have any inductive loads, or higher current loads It should be connected as close to the power supply is possible. This is to ground pins available on the power connector. This helps isolate inductive noise from going across the Arduino circuitry.

so if i have a reciever, gyroscope,ESCs and a couple resistors, what is the best way that i connect their grounds to the arduino without causing any damage

so if i have a reciever, gyroscope,ESCs and a couple resistors, what is the best way that i connect their grounds to the arduino without causing any damage

Add up the number of posts from the people who said it would be no problem and compare that to the number of posts from someone who said that it would be a problem. Look also at the number of Karma points, given to each person to see their standing here.

You are not going to damage your Arduino by using different, or the "wrong" ground connections.

Which can take the most current and should be used whenever possible.

All ground pins can "take" the same current. It is only if you wire the two ground pins in parallel that you reduce by half the already small resistance that any pin and socket introduces.

All the things you suggest take an insignificant amount of current, you are worrying too much.

Hi, I always used to grumble about the few ground pins on Arduino. A guy named Xiao in Beijing came up with the "Sensor Shield" a few years ago, that had a ground pin for every single I/O pin, and also a voltage pin for every I/O. So A "Servo" 3-pin connector could plug right in.

A couple of years ago I collaborated with another designer in Shenzhen to put ALL those pins on a regular UNO based design. He then came up with a nice 2 amp switchmode regulator and fit THAT on an UNO-compatible board. Now that looks like this: |500x396

I have sold over 8000 of these in the past 3 years, and they work great and are very easy to connect stuff to...

Sometimes frustration is the mother of invention!

DISCLAIMER: Mentioned stuff from my own shop...

Grumpy_Mike: Add up the number of posts from the people who said it would be no problem and compare that to the number of posts from someone who said that it would be a problem. Look also at the number of Karma points, given to each person to see their standing here.

You are not going to damage your Arduino by using different, or the "wrong" ground connections. All ground pins can "take" the same current. It is only if you wire the two ground pins in parallel that you reduce by half the already small resistance that any pin and socket introduces.

All the things you suggest take an insignificant amount of current, you are worrying too much.

man im soo sorry for the silly questions. im kinda new to all this tech stuff and really want to get to know the rigtht way to do stuff on an arduino. now i understand. it doesnt matter where i place my ground wires on the arduino. but does it cause any kind of overload or damage if i connect to wires to the same ground pin? and does the placement of the ground pins affect the software code im using? I KNOW !! SILLY QUESTIONS sorry guys

but does it cause any kind of overload or damage if i connect to wires to the same ground pin?

No.

does the placement of the ground pins affect the software code im using?

No.

I KNOW !! SILLY QUESTIONS

No. If you don't know you have to ask that is what we are here for. Questions are never silly but sadly some of the answers can be.

man you are my hero :slight_smile: thamk you alot . this helped me a lot in understanding wht i should do
i appreciate it brother

If you are that worried, then take ground off the supply that is powering the arduino. But if a piece of string has one end, then it has to have another. If you are drawing enough current off a pin for the return current to fry the ground plane, then it's definitely going to be enough to fry the pin.

hey guys. i was wondering if someone can help me by referencing me to a tutorial vid or artcle that explains how to connect a reciever to arduino and what to consider when choosing the reciever specs.
This may be basic stuff for some of you out there , but im learning from this forum alot and would appreciate any help possible.

how to connect a reciever to arduino

What sort of receiver?