How should I make a solar panel out of cells and charge a battery with them

So I want to make a pretty large solar panel just to see if I can power my room with them. HERE is the link to the cells I’m going to be using. They make about half a volt in direct sunlight, and 10 Amps also in direct sunlight. I will probably make 1 or 2 panels, probably with 8 or so cells. I’m not quite sure if I want to do them in parallel or in series. It already has a super high current, so maybe doing them in parallel isn’t the best idea. My goal is to make a solar panel that can charge a VERY large battery (I might make my own, but that’s an entirely different project). So, what are some recommendations you have and how should I tackle this project? Also, I have mild experience when it comes to circuits, and I have some simple equipment (multimeter, DC power supply, Arduino, breadboard).

bigsolarcell.jpg

You will also need a soldering iron and solder and wire capable of carrying the current you are planning for. Then you need to decide how to mount and support the cells and protect them from dust and moisture. And some fuses!
Paul

I am not seeing a link to the panels. At 0.5 volts 10 amps direct sun if you want a 12 VDC system you will need about 26 panels in series for 13 VDC and you can buy a 12 VDC solar charging system easier and less costly than you can build one. Placing panels in parallel the voltage remains the same and you multiply the current. Placing cells in series you have the current of a single cell and multiply the voltage. Thus with a 0.5 volt cell if you place 26 of them in series you get 26 * 0.5 = 13 Volts @ in this case 10 amps. That is about 130 watts of power in direct sun. Not really very much power.

Ron

The battery size is not the complete answer, you need to go through the watt hour calculations. The cells have to charge the batteries times about 1.2 or more depending on the chemistry, Your load is your watt hour requirement. Your cells need to supply that plus the battery charging current. Also factor in non solar production. Then you need to size the battery to supply power in the non solar production for as many days as you want.

zulu_jive:
So I want to make a pretty large solar panel just to see if I can power my room with them. HERE is the link to the cells I'm going to be using. They make about half a volt in direct sunlight, and 10 Amps also in direct sunlight. I will probably make 1 or 2 panels, probably with 8 or so cells. I'm not quite sure if I want to do them in parallel or in series. It already has a super high current, so maybe doing them in parallel isn't the best idea. My goal is to make a solar panel that can charge a VERY large battery (I might make my own, but that's an entirely different project). So, what are some recommendations you have and how should I tackle this project? Also, I have mild experience when it comes to circuits, and I have some simple equipment (multimeter, DC power supply, Arduino, breadboard).

Building the solar panel yourself is probably not the best idea you could have, especially not if you are asking here how to do.
It requires a lot of skills and materials that are not easy to get on the market. You will need solar aluminium frames and special glass that is enough transparent to uv and can mechanically sustain really evil meteorological constraints.
That is definitely not something for a garage project.
Currently already built solar panels are pretty cheap, and you almost surely never will beat that price with a DIY project. If you got some wafers for free, they are very likely to be some rejected components, and are only a minimal part of the total cost of a solar installation.

You can buy tinned copper strip for soldering cells together, and you'd use a schottky series diode
to prevent back-driving.

Mounting them properly is the tricky part, if you are going to have them outdoors in all weathers.

Yes, they are connected in series in a panel, 18 cells will give enough voltage to regulate down
to 6V in overcast lighting conditions, 36 for 12V.