HTML Buttons

OMG I have looked all over the place for some basic help on creating a simple button to turn on/off an LED using HTML.

I have a Twenty Ten and a Freetronics PoE Ethernet shield.

Is the Ethernet shield too new?

I have limited knowledge but am so looking forward to getting started. :(

I have a Twenty Ten and a Freetronics PoE Ethernet shield.

Where is the Arduino in this mix?

Is the Ethernet shield too new?

No.

I have limited knowledge but am so looking forward to getting started.

Start here, then.
http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/interact/forms.html

Sorry PaulS. I'm only starting out.

Arduino Twenty Ten is my board.

Gee, I just feel like I got in trouble. lol ;)

Thank's for the site, It's not making a huge amount of sense at the moment but I guess I'll just have to see what I can work out.

Start here, then. http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/interact/forms.html

Didn't help me at all.

Am I just not getting it or is it something no one really understands?

If it's possible for maybe a sample bit of code, that would be fantastic.

Im running out of ideas to type into google.. :'(

What exactly are you trying to do? Do you have the Arduino acting as a web server or a web client?

The code I am using at the moment reads Light and Temp values.

The values are viewed on a web page when you access the Arduino via the IP address I assigned it to suit my network.

The values are viewed on a web page when you access the Arduino via the IP address I assigned it to suit my network.

So, the Arduino is a server.

Having the Arduino return a page that contains a form is no different from having any other web server serve up a page with a form on it.

It still appears that this is a web page design issue rather than an Arduino issue.

If I'm missing something, feel free to set me straight.

Arduino and HTML Form:

http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1274596787/3#3

I find it amazing in this day and age that someone could successfully set up a microcontroller to act as a web server, serving up a web page with data from the microcontroller, yet not be able to write a web form to interact with the system.

/I must be getting old...

:D

Hey crOsh,

It's not hard to download an example piece of code and get it to run.

When you want to add some code to do something else it becomes a bit harder.

Maybe you guys need to chill. Everyone knows you guys are on top of your game and have this stuff down pat. But some of us are still learning.

I thought a Forum was where you could go to get help.

Obviously I am wrong.

Sorry I bought Arduino and damn sorry I found this Forum...

Maybe you need to take some time and remember what a forum is about.

Thanks Webmeister,

That has got me on the right track.

#include <WString.h>

No longer works

so I used
#include <SPI.h>

and I’ll have to work out the changes.

Appreciate your help.
:slight_smile:

Lets keep in mind that you probably did not learn how to drive a car using a Formula 1 car.

Jumping into ETHERNET with Arduino is cool... but I think it's not really on the list of starter projects. If it is... it shouldn't be.

You need to get the BASICS worked out... then the "futzing" with someone's code to make it do what you want gets a WHOLE lot easier.

The goal here is to come up with your own ideas and solutions... not have people write code for you.

Maybe you need to take some time and remember what a forum is about.

I was merely commenting on how, back in the day (ie, mid-1990s or so?), one would be more likely to know how to set up a CGI-aware web page with forms and such - long before they would know anything about setting up the web server it was running on.

Then again, this was back in the days of SLIP/PPP and WinSock (among other anacronisms)...

I wasn't knocking on you specifically, just commenting on the fact that in a span of 10-15 years we've gotten to the point in technology where one can easily and cheaply attempt to run before they can walk (and all the resulting potential "disaster" that implies).

You're having problems setting up a web form, using it, and understanding it. Others have problems understanding why they are burning out their Arduino's by direct-connecting devices to the pins without knowing Ohm's Law (or how to read a datasheet).

It just used to be that one would take the time to study and learn at a pace suitable to the knowledge to be gained. Others have told me "That time is past"; still they fumble and make me wonder "has it really?".

Like I said, I must be old...

;)

The below link has some basic info on generating html with the arduino.

http://www.scienceprog.com/getting-hands-on-arduino-ethernet-shield/

I must apologize for venting my frustration, but that's what it is.

Getting the correct answer means asking the correct question.

Knowing the correct question is not as easy as it sounds.

I don't want the complete code for my project, just some direction.

Thank you zoomkat.

I think it's time for a beer or two. ;)

Busted Duck: there’s some discussion of this exact thing on the Adafruit forums, including a reference to the Webduino library.

http://forums.adafruit.com/viewtopic.php?f=31&t=10347

The “Web_Buzzer” example included with Webduino should get you on the right track.

Jon
Practical Arduino: www.practicalarduino.com

Thanks heaps Jonathan,

I found that link a great help.

I am slowly getting there with bits and pieces of help for everyone.

This is great stuff.. ;)

In Busted Duck's defense, I have found myself in the same situation. I bought an Arduino, got started with some simple examples and started brainstorming. I then had the same problem as Duck...I was getting into projects that were a little more complex than my level of understanding would allow me to accomplish.

The good part about all of this is that I have continued to learn and my crazy projects have pushed me to learn more than I knew before I started the project. I think that is part of what the Arduino platform is all about.

Action Item: Unfortunately, I am not qualified to do this, but if someone were willing to write a short manual that could be used for beginners. I have the Arduino notebook, which is a great tool. What I have in mind is probably multiple notebooks like the Arduino Notebook. It could be used to lead a beginner through important building blocks in their knowledge base. One could be written about Arduino HTML, for example. There is a plethora of subjects to be written about, but it could be like a workbook, which could have example programs that could get someone started and some code snippets that show how to accomplish different tasks. I don't suggest that this would provide a complete program, so the "student" would still have work to do. I just think it would be a good start and point of reference for beginners.

One could be written about Arduino HTML, for example.

I think posting simple working code is a quick and practical way to get somebody started when a tutorial is not available.

In the short term, I agree. Just thought it would be nice to have another resource to peruse for info.