ISO C++ forbids comparison between pointer and integer

I have a newb question and I’m guessing a simple mistake
this is my first project and the code below works perfect and communicates with the app I wrote but I’m trying to expand it and add an LED strip and the app will have about 40 buttons to select different colors.
The single letter or number works fine now but obviously with the way it written I’m going to run out of letters when I add the strip after searching I thought changing to say if(BluetoothData==“drive”) should have fixed it but I get the ISO C++ forbids comparison between pointer and integer error
where did I go wrong

 #include <SoftwareSerial.h>

SoftwareSerial bluetooth(10, 11); // RX, TX
int relayD = 2;
int relayP = 3;
int relayT = 4;
int relayG = 5; 
int BluetoothData;

void setup() 
{
  bluetooth.begin(9600);
  pinMode(relayD,OUTPUT);
  pinMode(relayP,OUTPUT);
  pinMode(relayT,OUTPUT);
  pinMode(relayG,OUTPUT);
}

void loop()
{
   if (bluetooth.available())
   {
     BluetoothData=bluetooth.read();
     
     if(BluetoothData=='d')
       {  
         digitalWrite(relayD,1);
          delay(1000);
          digitalWrite(relayD,0);
       }
       
      if(BluetoothData=='p')
       {  
         digitalWrite(relayP,1);
          delay(1000);
          digitalWrite(relayP,0);
       }
       
      if(BluetoothData=='t')
       {  
         digitalWrite(relayT,1);
        delay(1000);
          digitalWrite(relayT,0);
       }
       
      if(BluetoothData=='g')
       {  
         digitalWrite(relayG,1);
         delay(1000);
          digitalWrite(relayG,0);
       }
       

       {
         digitalWrite(relayD,0);
         digitalWrite(relayP,0);
         digitalWrite(relayT,0);
         digitalWrite(relayG,0);

       }
     
    }
      delay(100);
}

tbird_app2.ino (1.14 KB)

That if don't do what you need the it do. It seems a little odd but its the way it is. For C/C++ (the language of Arduino) "drive" can't be compared to a single character (because is what you are doing). "drive" can be stored in an array of characters (commonly called string) and to compared must be compared position by position. In C++ (this language is the common C but enhanced) we have the String object, that do the same thing that the array of characters, but in a most friendly way for the programmer.

Take a look to the examples that you have in your IDE for strings. You have copies of that in the page of Arduino: http://arduino.cc/en/Reference/StringObject

If you need more specific help just ask.

How are you trying to check if an int is equal to a string ?

What are you actually trying to do there ?

Thanks for the link luisilva I will read up some more

I think that's were I am getting messed up I'm not letting it know there is a string so I need to research more

I guess drive may have been a bad term to use. The idea is I'm using this to control my car opening doors (no handles) and lights on the inside so besides not having enough char I want to use strings for a little added security. I plan on changing the pass code on the Bluetooth after I get it all working and done but using strings will help if someone gets lucky and gets access.