maximum current output

hello everyone
I just want to know what is the maximum Amper the following boards can supply.
Note / I don't mean from a single output pin which is smt near 20 mA
what I mean is totally current which should be smt near 200 mA but I need the exact number
the boards are
Arduino UNO
MEGA
NANO
DUE

edit/thanks for all the responses and sorry for not mentioning what sensors I will be using.
i will use 7 (URM09 sensors) so 140mA
plus a gyro sensor MPU-6050 that needs a 4mA
plus characteristic i2c display with a backlight that will take 18.5 mA
so the total required amper will be 163 mA

the Arduino will be supplied with 12V from an external battery pack
and all the components will be connected to the 5v pin and GND pin

Read the datasheet for the chips! :slight_smile:

What is the level of Vin? The higher it is, the less current you can draw from 5V or 3.3V before the regulators overheat.
If you are passing along 5V from the USB port, then 500mA would be the max on USB2.0.

USB3.0 may support higher currents, but last I knew, USB3.0 did not work reliably for many Arduino boards. I have not done any testing myself.

If you are looking at the total current a chip can support via it IO pins, that is different.
328/1284/2560 chips can handle 200mA on each VCC (Not AVCC) & GND pin. Thus a 2560 with 4 VCC pins could support 800mA, while USB could not supply that much. There tables in section 30 or 31 of the datasheet with further limitations of current for each port.

That is like asking what color is the guy down the street's buddy painted his widget. You need to tell us how you are supplying power to the Arduino. Since you are asking Amper you have not even done the basic research to see what you are asking. Remember, an Arduino a power supply it is not. Also define what the load is, each type of load has different effects. What voltage are you going to use? A schematic of what your system looks like would help, I can power the Arduinos several different ways.

missdrew:
Read the datasheet for the chips! :slight_smile:

trust me I did but I got lost in the data sheets is mentioned that the current supplied through each pin is 20/40 mA
the total current that can go through all pins is 160/200 mA
and yet the current that can go through the 5v pin and GND is 0.5-1 A
so I just didn't understand

and yet the current that can go through the 5v pin and GND is 0.5-1 A

Please provide the source of that information.

sterretje:
Please provide the source of that information.

http://robotics.lib-ieronimoub.gr/?p=715
Hope this helps

gilshultz:
That is like asking what color is the guy down the street's buddy painted his widget. You need to tell us how you are supplying power to the Arduino. Since you are asking Amper you have not even done the basic research to see what you are asking. Remember, an Arduino a power supply it is not. Also define what the load is, each type of load has different effects. What voltage are you going to use? A schematic of what your system looks like would help, I can power the Arduinos several different ways.

Thanks for reminding me to improve the post pls try to have a look on it

arduino99noob:
http://robotics.lib-ieronimoub.gr/?p=715
Hope this helps

Quote from above link (emphasis added)

Note: If not powered by USB, the total 5V current limit coming out of the Arduino is limited by the voltage regulator on your particular board, and/or your input power supply, whichever provides less power. Let’s assume your power supply going to the Arduino can provide 7~12V and >= 1A. If this is the case, the 5V power is limited strictly by your Arduino board’s voltage regulator.

So you will need to check the specs of the onboard regulator. Note that if you feed with 12V to the input of the regulator and draw 1A, that results in 7W that's converted to heat and needs to be dissiplated by the voltage regulator. That will require a (proper) heatsink, not a small piece (of copper?) on a PCB.

sterretje:
Quote from above link (emphasis added)So you will need to check the specs of the onboard regulator. Note that if you feed with 12V to the input of the regulator and draw 1A, that results in 7W that's converted to heat and needs to be dissiplated by the voltage regulator. That will require a (proper) heatsink, not a small piece (of copper?) on a PCB.

thanks for the advice I will keep that in mind. but still, if the device is supposed to provide 1A then I think no heatsink is required because it is designed for that

OK - Ignore all the information you have been given an pull 1Amp through the 5V pin, but don't come to us when you have caused your arduino to fail!

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