Optical fiber to UART?

Hi

I have an arduino in which I want to connect it to optical fiber (internet)
Is there such a device in which I connect it to the arduino using UART, while it's connected to optical fiber (internet)?
I searched but didn't seem to find an answer for this

Please help me
Thank you

Please, look here.

GolamMostafa:
Please, look here.

Thank you for your reply
I did look at that
That is serial connector which is different than UART
What I want is UART not RS

Thank you

What I want is UART not RS

1. The Arduino UNO has an asynchronous Serial Port which is known as UART Port. UART stands for Universal Asynchronous Reception and Transmission (Receiver/Transmitter).

2. The signals that are available at the DPin-0 and DPin-1 (RX, TX) pins of UNO are UART signals, and these are at TTL levels (asyncTTL).

3. The asyncTTL signal can travel at best 10-15 feet; after that they become distorted.

4. To overcome the problem of Step-3 and to allow the signal to travel up to 100-150 feet without undergoing noticeable distortion, the Radio Shack Company (many years ago) had developed the RS232 scheme in which the TTL level signal (0V =LL, 5V = LH) was transformed into (+12V = LL, -12V = LH).

Summary:
We have UART signal of TTL Level
We have UART Signal of RS232 (simply RS) Level.

@GolamMostafa, you seem to have an uncanny ability to make simple things complicated.

The implication of your Reply #1 is that there are plenty of devices that can convert RS232 signal levels to optical fibre transmissions - though why you posted a link to a page of images escapes me.

Then it seems to follow that if the OP needs to connect one of those RS232 devices to an Arduino he just needs a MAX232 device to convert between TTL and RS232 signal levels.

...R

ad0rs:
Hi

I have an arduino in which I want to connect it to optical fiber
Is there such a device in which I connect it to the arduino using UART or any other serial, while it's connected to optical fiber router on the other end?
I searched but didn't seem to find an answer for this

Please help me
Thank you

Before you select any adapter, you need to know the type for optical fiber and the type of connector on the end of the cable. You may also need to know what protocol is used by your optical fiber router.

Paul

Paul_KD7HB:
Before you select any adapter, you need to know the type for optical fiber and the type of connector on the end of the cable. You may also need to know what protocol is used by your optical fiber router.

Paul

Thank you for your reply
I will check the cable name
But I don't know the protocol
To tell you the details:
I have an optical fiber connected to the internet
My point is to connect my embedded system to the internet using optical fiber
I found this:

But I don't know if it would works or not
I have 0 knowledge about optical fiber

ad0rs:
To tell you the details:
I have an optical fiber connected to the internet

Doesn't the optical fibre internet connection terminate at your router?

If so your Arduino just needs to connect to the router using either Ethernet or WiFi.

...R

Robin2:
Doesn't the optical fibre internet connection terminate at your router?

If so your Arduino just needs to connect to the router using either Ethernet or WiFi.

...R

Hi
Sorry for that
It was a mis-description from myside
I will fix it now
I don't know really from where the optical fiber is coming (I assumed it's a router)
I have an optical fiber given to me that is connected somehow to the internet
I don't see what's the other end of it

ad0rs:
I don't know really from where the optical fiber is coming (I assumed it's a router)
I have an optical fiber given to me that is connected somehow to the internet
I don't see what's the other end of it

Then you need to find all that out first before anyone here can help you.

...R

you seem to have an uncanny ability to make simple things complicated.

A poster spent 1867 days in the Forum; he contributed 47962 posts; he earned 2282 karma points. Let me compute in my own way the arbitrary popularity index of his posts this way ---

(2282/47962)*(1/1867) = 0.0025 :slight_smile:

Another poster spent 3116 days in the Forum; he contributed 86309 posts; he earned 2608 karma points. Let me compute in my own way the arbitrary popularity index of his posts this way ---

(2608/86309)*(1/3116) = 0.0009 :slight_smile:

... the Radio Shack Company (many years ago) had developed the RS232 scheme ...

I think the Electronic Industries Association (EIA) which introduced this Recommended Standard (RS) would debate that statement.

Don

I think the Electronic Industries Association (EIA) which introduced this Recommended Standard (RS) would debate that statement.

I heard at around 1992 that Radio Shack Company developed the RS scheme (I never verified). There are references in the Wikipedia in favor of your saying that EIA has defined (standardized) the RS-232 signal signatures of the DB9 connector; but, the question remains as to which Company's Engineer(s) developed it.

GolamMostafa:
A poster spent 1867 days in the Forum; he contributed 47962 posts; he earned 2282 karma points. Let me compute in my own way the arbitrary popularity index of his posts this way ---

(2282/47962)*(1/1867) = 0.0025 :slight_smile:

Another poster spent 3116 days in the Forum; he contributed 86309 posts; he earned 2608 karma points. Let me compute in my own way the arbitrary popularity index of his posts this way ---

(2608/86309)*(1/3116) = 0.0009 :slight_smile:

This isn't a popularity contest!
If you want that, enter the Miss Universe beauty contest!

But since you are vain,
the popularity contest is
you GolamMostafa = 52 karma / 1232 = 0.04220
Robin2 = 2282 karma / 47966 = 0.04757

**0.04757 (Robin2) > 0.04220 (GolamMostafa) **

GolamMostafa:
I heard at around 1992 that Radio Shack Company developed the RS scheme (I never verified). There are references in the Wikipedia in favor of your saying that EIA has defined (standardized) the RS-232 signal signatures of the DB9 connector; but, the question remains as to which Company's Engineer(s) developed it.

Please stop generating this misinformation.

I didn't say anything about any connector being specified by the EIA.

I believe it was IBM that first switched from the previously used DB25 to the DB9 when they introduced their AT series of computers.

Don

Please stop generating this misinformation.

That's correct that you have not said explicitly about DB9 connector in your statement; but, the DB9 is implied when we talk about RS232 scheme. Association of DB25 connector with COM port is a historical issue; DB25 connector (as a LPT Port) is still available in some of the computers.

I received so many warnings from the Moderator, but not a single one with RED COLOR.

GolamMostafa:
That's correct that you have not said explicitly about DB9 connector in your statement; but, the DB9 is implied when we talk about RS232 scheme. Association of DB25 connector with COM port is a historical issue; DB25 connector (as a LPT Port) is still available in some of the computers.

I received so many warnings from the Moderator, but not a single one with RED COLOR.

NO.

Nothing is "implied".

Nothing!

You merely assumed.
And you do know what they say about people who assume?
assume makes an ass out of u and me

.

How quickly they forget: --> http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=546531.msg3728089#msg3728089

Don

How quickly they forget:

OK! I am taking back the RED COLOR from the word STOP of my this post.

GolamMostafa:
1. The Arduino UNO has an asynchronous Serial Port which is known as UART Port. UART stands for Universal Asynchronous Reception and Transmission (Receiver/Transmitter).

2. The signals that are available at the DPin-0 and DPin-1 (RX, TX) pins of UNO are UART signals, and these are at TTL levels (asyncTTL).

3. The asyncTTL signal can travel at best 10-15 feet; after that they become distorted.

4. To overcome the problem of Step-3 and to allow the signal to travel up to 100-150 feet without undergoing noticeable distortion, the Radio Shack Company (many years ago) had developed the RS232 scheme in which the TTL level signal (0V =LL, 5V = LH) was transformed into (+12V = LL, -12V = LH).

Your 'perception' of history seems to differ significantly from the Wikipedia article on RS232;